“Para Adán, el paraíso era donde estaba Eva.” (Mark…

Tras haber recorrido la isla de waiheke en bicicleta lo cual se volvió un poco más complicado de lo que habíamos planeado ya que la isla estaba compuesta por innumerables colinas que parecían no acabar.
La ruta transcurría por carreteras tranquilas que cortaban el paisaje bucólico en el que se encontraban como un pincel el silencio blanco del lienzo. El verde se extendía a ambos lados del camino punteado a veces por los pequeños puntos blancos que eran las ovejas, a veces marrones y negros que resultaban ser las vacas y cortados en la lejanía por el azul del mar.
A veces una tímida playa se postraba a lo largo del camino invitándote a bañarte y disfrutar del paraíso y otras, acantilados te mostraban su autoridad ofreciéndote la vista de la que se disfrutaba desde lo alto de estos.
Todo era perfecto excepto que íbamos en bicicleta, y ese paraíso nos demostró que no iba a ser fácil recorrerlo. Cada ascenso iba precedido de su inmediato descenso y viceversa, con lo que el camino se asemejaba a una montaña rusa. Esto hizo la rutina un poco más cansina de lo que esperábamos pero la belleza del paisaje y la armonía de la que podíamos disfrutar pagaba el déficit que el esfuerzo creaba.
El primer día alcanzamos el este de la isla donde a parte de las nombradas vistas pudimos disfrutar de un enclave para la práctica de escalada sin cuerda “Boulder” en unas rocas que parecían haber caído del cielo como si de lluvia se tratara. Tras la jornada decidimos hacer una clase de yoga durante el atardecer para relajar y acampar en un pequeño bosque que se situaba en la cima de la colina.
A la mañana siguiente volvimos a disfrutar de un no menos impresionante amanecer mientras desayunábamos al refugio del viento tras una de las nombradas rocas. 
De nuevo nos pusimos en camino hacia la batalla contra el desnivel y comenzamos nuestras subidas y bajadas que tras unas cuantas horas de pedaleo nos llevaron a una playa maravillosa en la que disfrutamos de una deliciosa comida, un baño y una siesta. Tras la siesta, otro baño y recolectar algunas almejas frescas de la playa para preparar una cena y encaminarnos de nuevo a la gran ciudad. 
En el camino, antes de llegar al ferri, decidimos hacer una parada para comprar un delicioso helado antes de despedirnos del nombrado enclave. 
Sin duda otra excursión exitosa a los alrededores de Auckland, como no podía ser de otra manera en Nueva Zelanda.


“It seems to me I spent my life in…

I wrote the Spanish version of my trip and I did not want to be impolite with the English people so I am writing it now in English so you can enjoy it too.
I just finished one of the best experiences of my life. It begun on 7th of April on the way back from a weekend trip when discussing with my friend possible trips in the south island. I was expecting to do this trip in winter so I would have time to save and the whole month to travel but they showed me that maybe many places would be not accessible or very hard to get because of the weather conditions or the amount of snow in the mountains. So I quickly reconsider the trip and decided to do it taking the advantage of the mid semester break, so I will not miss as much class. I started to plan everything and found a cheap flight from Auckland to Christchurch for 126$ with the luggage included. I did not have a tent or a bivouac bag (bivi bag) to get myself covered from the rain so I went to buy one. Finally I decided to get a bivouac because was less weight and easier to transport and to carry it back home.  After buying the plane ticket and the bivi bag I notice that I had expended all the money I had left till the first of May. So my only option was to go to my trip just with the 40$ in cash I had left in my pocket, walking and Hitch hiking.
So I had to plan everything and prepare all my stuff in a bit more than one day. The only big problem was that I had to take all my food for the 14 days I was going to be away in my backpack which made things much heavier.
In order to save weight all my food was dehydrated as rice, mashed potatoes and noodles. I had also cooked 1 egg per day for the whole trip and I had seasoned already the rice so I did not have to bring the spices to the trip. For the breakfast I had oats, tea and lots of sugar. For vitamins I had carrots and apples.
Day 1- Auckland-Christchurch-Arthur’s Pass
So there I was, with my big backpack going into the luggage carousel with the tag of “last bag” as I had to run through the airport to catch the plane. With a smile on my face, the backpack on my back and 30$ in my pocket, I exited the airport. The first thing I needed to was to go buying a gas bottle and some food with the little money I had left. After the shopping my budget was reduced to 10$. I was pretty lucky and Maori guy called Manu, which means bird, gave me a ride even if he had to go in the opposite direction to take me out of the city in order to get better rides. I had no problems with the rides till I pass the last town of the east of the Southern Alps, where I walked a lot without a ride. I was already checking the sides of the road to find a place to crash when I got a ride which brought me just to the place I needed to go, a free campsite in the end of the route I was planning to do the next day. I had some special dinner for the first night as I brought some meat and tomatoes which I could mix with the rice. I could not use the egg I had prepared for that night as a New Zealand parrot called Kea stole it when I was looking in my backpack for some water for cooking.


I got up before the sun and started walking when the sun was burning with its sunshine the marvellous peaks of the Southern Alps. The track was not marked, so it was basically walking up the riverbed which was very rocky. I had to cross the Waimakariri River a couple of times. At this time of the year it is almost dry but still enough water to make it tricky to cross. Probably because I still was a little bit sleepy and I could not think with clarity, I got wet in the first stream I had to cross. I slipped in a rock and my foot went into the water and so I did with the other and I crossed it walking through the water. I kept going and soon I reached the crow river valley where the track was alternating between a wild forest and the rocky riverbed. I was an easy path, sometimes not well marked, that took me to the Crow Hut in about 4 hours, so I was at the hut at roughly 11.30. The only person left in the hut was leaving soon so I will be alone, which was not that bad as I did not had money to pay the hut. Around 12.30 started to pour and it did not stop till the next morning so everything I could do was to light a fire, read some magazines which were in the hut, some yoga, and playing ukulele. Pretty random things! And so I did. The only problem was that the toilet was outside so I had to take a leak from the door of the hut in order to not get wet. Fortunately I had not to go for something bigger.


This was one of the hardest days in my trip and for sure one of the scariest days in my life. The rain stopped just before the sunshine started to illuminate the sky, so I was lucky enough to continue my tramp.  I was exiting the hut at 8.00am and around 8.20am I was at the bottom of a very big scree slope. It was only 1km of distance but had a gradient of 50% as it goes up more than 500m. The route was clearly made to do it in the opposite direction, but as I had no money to stay close to the other end I did it backwards. I started to climb, everything was falling apart and the weight of the backpack did not help to keep my balance. At the beginning the inclination was kind of ok, but a bit before half way it increased considerably and I had to go all the time helping myself with my hands in order to not be another rolling stone downhill. When I was little 200m from the top, I decided to get close to one of the sides as there was not that much looses rocks. Unconsciously I started to climb in the cliff as I was following the path with fewer rocks in the way. After a while I noticed that I was in the cliff about 6m high of the bottom of a small scree slope which ended in another 20m cliff. I was shocked at that very moment. Only 5 meter laterally there was a “safe place” and after thinking in turning around, I determined that was much more difficult. I tried to move, but a couple of times I got myself almost hanging from the cliff due to the rocks falling from my feet. I did not know what to do I was trapped in the cliff and it did not seem to be a very busy route. I was just expecting to fall in my back so the backpack could stop a little bit my fall. After a while I decided to keep going to the safe place, so I climbed very, very slow to not grab one of the falling rocks. I had been climbing a lot before my trip so I felt strong enough to keep going but the backpack was a handicap that I have never had and was disturbing my balance. Finally I could reach the safe edge and take a deep breath before keep going. When I got to the top of the scree slope my heart was pumping hard and my breathing was irregular, and the stunning views did not produce any effect on me till I calmed down. I did it, I survive! I kept going in the path going through the crest of the mountain, now a little more indicated. Once and for all I got to the Avalanche peak were an amazing view delighted me in exchange of the effort done. The way back was not less hard as I had to hurry to try to get to the road soon enough to get a ride to my next destination, Mt Cook. Unfortunately I was not lucky that afternoon and fact that there are no close towns to the village did not help so after 3 hours in the shoulder of the road without getting a ride, I decided to walk back the 10 km that there was from where I was till the free campsite I stayed the night before. This night I was aware about the Keas so I filled my pockets with rocks and let them know that there was no food for them today. They gave up after a few tries to get close end went to bother other campers, so I was happy. The night came and the impressive view of the stars made me sleep so well after the tough day.


Day 4- Arthur’s Pass-Lake Pukaki
I woke up pretty early, so I could walk if I did not get a ride as the day before I was not so lucky. Surprisingly I got a ride with the first car that passed by. The man was a former motorbike gangster who told me some interesting stories about how he could leave the band 30 years ago and not get killed as would have been now a day. He also told me about the jail and gave me some useful tips for life. After a couple of rides from where the gangster a guy who was going from Christchurch to Dunedin for an epic party, apparently 10.000 students in the street. He left me in the shoulder of the junction with the road I had to take to follow my direction with a beer in my hand. I started to walk in my direction in a not very busy road so walked for a while until a man picked me up. He was a dairy farmer, and we had a very nice chat about ourselves. When he dropped me off he told me that apart from dairy farmer he was the Chancellor of the Lincoln University and he offered me money. I refused it as I normally only accept food and drinks but he really insisted so I accepted the 60$ he was giving me (In life you have to be honest but not stupid!). As I knew that I will not have money till first of May and still had to survive in Auckland after I finished my trip I put the money in a “safe pocket” to not expend it. So I thanked him so much and kept going in my way. My plan had changed as in the summit of the Avalanche Peak, a German guy I meet at the top told me to go to a nice spot in Lake Pukaki rather than Lake Tekapo that is the one I had planned. I spend a couple of hours at Lake Tekapo and even if it was a very beautiful place, I decided to keep going to the next one, Lake Pukaki. An old man of 76 years old gave me a ride this time; he was a former climber and guide to go to the top of Mt Cook, the highest peak in New Zealand. He offered me to drive me to my next destination, Mt Cook Village, but I declined it as I was very curious about the very nice spot the German guy told me, and the views were already stunning. The German guy was totally correct, the views from the free campsite were amazing, a beautiful blue lake due to the sediments enclosed in the ice of the glacier which fills the lake, and the highest peak of New Zealand reflecting at the bottom of the lake. All of that was companied with an incredible sunset, and a better star spangled sky!


Day 5- Lake Pukaki-Mueller’s hut-Queenstown
As the night before I woke up with an impressive view of the Mt cook. At 7:00am I was already walking in the road heading Mt Cook Village. I was pretty lucky and just arrive to the junction of the road going there I got picked up by one of the pilots of one of those companies that flies to the glacier and land on it. We had a nice chat and he gave me some tips about the weather and explained me that was getting worst that afternoon. He dropped me just at the beginning of my next route the Muller’s hut.  In the car park I found a dollar! So I started to go up through the around 1800 steps that there is to the top. It took me 2.20h again gaining time to the statistics. When I got to the top I could contemplate the marvellous views from the top where you can see the Lake Pukaki valley, some glaciers and of course the impressive Mt Cook, looking after the Southern Alps. Again the Way back was really tough and the weather was changing. It started to get really, really windy. In the way back I met again the man who gave me a ride the night before, The 76 year old guide. He offered me to give me a ride to a small town in my way to Queenstown and also gave me a couple of beers and a bottle of wine, as he had to take all the things left from a birthday party he had been the night before. There I was again, in the shoulder of the road with my thumb up waiting for the next ride. A very kind American guy, who is working in Afghanistan   gave me the ride to Queenstown and in the way we picked up another two hitch hikers one of them invite me diner in exchange of one of the beers, pretty nice deal. Because they were back from the epic party and were so tired did not want to go out for a while so I hid my backpack in a holiday park I had gate-crashed and went to town with the American guy and the bottle of wine that I had left. We hit a couple of bars till we found one we liked and stayed there for a while. The American guy invited me to pitcher of beer, and we were playing some games and dancing with mostly foreign girls. I went back to the place I have spotted to sleep, a little bit of grass between two trees and two apartments buildings. As the place looked very sheltered and the sky was pretty clear, and I was tired and tipsy, I did not use the bivi bag. That night I felt sleep pretty easily.


Day 6- Queenstown-Routeburn Track
I did not need an alarm that morning as I woke up with the rain hitting my face and feeling cold and wet. Unfortunately, it rained and my sleeping bag got so wet. It was already 7.30 and there was light enough for people to see me sleeping like a homeless in the holiday park so I packed all my things pretty quick except for the sleeping bag that I needed to dry, so I bought a token for the dryer which cost me 4$ for only 30 min, That left me with “only” 5$. I paid expensively for my mistake. I hit the road again, this time pretty late as I had to wait for the sleeping bag to dry a little bit. In 3 rides and about 10km of walking I got to arrive to the beginning of the Routeburn Track. It was 12.30pm very late to start a tramp but I had no choice so I started the Track. It starts in a jungle forest and follows the river upstream through the whole valley. Nice swinging bridges cross the multiple streams that go into the river. As I was already late for the day and because I had no money to pay the huts or the campsites, I had planned to stay in the middle of the track and either use the Harris saddle hut or look for some bivouac rocks that a woman who picked me up recommended me. When I was leaving Routeburn Falls Hut, a Warden from the DOC (Department of Conservation) stopped me in the track and asked me for the ticket for the hut. As I did not have any and did explain him my situation expecting some understanding, he told me that the next free campsite was in Lake Howden Hut about 20km from where I was and it was already 3.00pm. He alerted me not to sleep in the emergency shelter as he was going to check it and that he was calling the warden in Lake Mackenzie to check if he arrive or not. Such a stupid man! So I had no choice, I had to try to walk all the way to pass Lake Mackenzie Hut. In a little more than 3 hours I was already at around Lake Mackenzie hut where I found a nice bivouac rock to sleep. I was already dark and I could not switch on my head lamp as I did not want to attract attention from the wardens in the hut so I just did everything without light, prepared my food and waited till it got really dark to set up my camp. That night I slept a little bit worried about the wardens checking the place.


Day 7- Routeburn track– Te Anau- Kepler Track
Normally I woke up before the sunrise but this day I woke up a little bit earlier just to walk in the dark passing by the hut. I was lucky and nobody saw me so I kept going to the Howden Hut where I stopped to have breakfast and prepare a tea. As it was pretty early and I had time enough I decided to go up to Key Summit where I could contemplate the beautiful landscape of the fjord and some of the Southern Alps Peaks. The Trip to Te Anau was very nice as the man who picked me up was friendly and we had a good chat. I told him about my trip and he told me about how he taught his dog to be a rescue dog. He also gave me a couple of apples! I was expecting to find a free place to sleep in Te Anau but unfortunately when I went to the visitor centre there was no free camping and was prohibited to camp anywhere around the town or the beginning of the track. So again I had no place to sleep. As it was early in the day and I was missing meat so much I decided to go to the supermarket where I bought packed ham and some bread so I could have some proteins. I walked nicely around the lake all the way to the track start. I decided to camp hidden from the track close to the first campsite of the track, about 5 km from the start. I hide between the bushes in the beach in a very nice spot with lake views. When I was just about to start setting up my camp, I saw a DOC boat patrolling the beach so I quickly put everything in my backpack and this on the bushes and taking advantage of my dark clothes I pretend to be a rock so they could not see me. The boat took about 15 min to check the beach and so I was a rock, but the sandflies were biting me all over the uncovered spots of my body, my ankles, my wrist and hands and my face, taking advantage of my rock emulation. Finally they left the beach without knowing that I was there and I could set up my camp and get into the sleeping bag closing it to the top to avoid insect to bite me!
No doubt the hardest day physically! After the Routeburn Track I noticed that was not going to be as easy to sleep in the emergency shelters that there where in the track so I decided to go directly from Brod Bay, where I was, till Shallow Bay in the other lake, 42km away. It was going to be a hard day but I will avoid paying in the huts or in the campgrounds and also from getting caught in the emergency shelters. In order to not be suspicious if got too early to the first hut, I calculated the time to be there in a time that seems reasonable to have been done in the day. I left Brod Bay at 6.30am, so if they ask me, I could say I left at 5.30 from the parking. I arrived to the first hut, around 9.30, made a coffee with a lot of sugar in order to have energy and took a good breakfast. After 20 min of rest I kept going uphill as I could not lose much more time if I wanted to arrive in time to Shallow Bay. It was very cloudy and foggy with not much visibility but finally I crossed the clouds limit and the day was very clear, I was above the clouds. It looked like the clouds were the sea and all the peaks and mountains that were breaking through it seemed to be islands. For one moment I felt like one of the Greek gods in Mount Olympus. After a while in the top of Mt Luxmore I had to move due to my lack of time. The rocky landscape converted back again in the jungle after I got lower than 1200m where the tree line is. At 2.00pm I got to hit the second hut, Iris Burn Hut. Everything was going good but I was starting to feel exhausted. The signpost in the hut was indication 6 hours to the next hut that was close to where the free campsite was, but I needed to do it in four as around 6.30pm it gets dark. So I started walking fast in order to achieve the goal, get there by 6.30pm. Around 4.00pm my feet were totally destroyed, a huge pain was invading my body but my mind still had the control of my body so I had to keep going, I was a little depressed because I expected to get to Rocky Point Shelter, which was in the middle of the way by 4.00pm. I took a 20 min rest to grab some food because I had not eaten anything since 12.30pm and I kept going. Surprisingly the Rocky Point Shelter was 300m far from the point where I had stopped. My moral was mended so I restore my fast rhythm to get to Shallow Bay before it got really dark. At 6.05pm I was already at the last hut, Moturau Hut and the hoped signpost was there reminding me that I still needed to keep going for 35 more minutes, but I was so happy that my body did not hurt anymore, I was that happy that in some moment I just wanted to run all the way just to get there and have that moment I had been waiting so bad to happen, the finish of the journey. By the campsite there was also a basic hut. I check if there was anybody sleeping inside and also the visitors book to check how often the warden came to the hut. I was lucky and also was the middle of the week and the warden will not come till Friday so I was able to stay in the hut without paying. I rest sitting for half an hour and when I tried to stand up my feet were not responding, they had too much for the day so I had to move crawling within the room to prepare my dinner and to start a fire, which was nice to finish drying the sleeping bag. That night I sleep so well!


Day 9- Kepler Track- Invercargill- Fortrose
That morning I was not in a hurry at all so I woke up late made a fire in the beach and had a nice breakfast. I was by the lake and there was some special soap to stop spreading a kind of bacteria from both Islands, so I used it as a gel and had a bath by the lake. There were also two really big tents in the campsite, the only two in there. I saw them the night before but I did not pay much attention, but now I was rested, my curiosity was bigger too so I asked if there was somebody. Nobody answered and the tent seemed abandoned so I open one to check. In the first one there was nothing inside, in the second one there was a very big kitchen set up and some food left. I looked around and picked some minor stuff as cheese 2 cereal bars and mandarins, just enough to complete my diet a little bit and respect the people food. I walked so quietly that morning, it was the first time in the trip that I spent the same amount of time that the one indicated in the signs, even a little bit more. I had finished all my tracks for the trip, now was mainly road and seaside. I got a ride back to Te Anau and another one from Te Anau directly to Invercargill. The man was a hunter and told me that he had to stop to make a couple of jobs before heading to Invercargill. I was not in a rush so I accepted. We stopped in a diary farm and while he was tinting one window to avoid some kind of light reflecting in a camera, I was outside watching how 1000 cows entered in the installations to get rid of their milk. I was so amazed how much milk they can produce in this kind of farms. The man dropped me at the junction of Fortrose road and gave me some fresh venison from his trophy.  From there I got another ride all the way to Fortrose where I was delighted with a marvelous sunset.


Day 10 Fortrose- Nugget Point
Something woke me up, was the raining hitting the bivouac bag. Fortunately I had it this time. I waited a little bit for the rain to easy off in order to pack all my stuff and leave without getting so wet. Luckily it stopped during ten minutes, time enough to get up and pack all my things. It was a very bad day, rainy and cold, but I had to keep going so I started to walk in the shoulder as usual.  I got a ride which took me to the next town in the road where I had breakfast and some tea, covered in a bus stop. I waited a little bit to dry before going again under the rain. In another ride I was in Waikawa the closest town to Curio Bay where I would be able to see penguins and dolphins in the beach. I started to walk the 5km from Waikawa to Curio bay after a while waiting for the rain to easy off. In the middle of the way I met a Japanese girl in her bike. She had been touring with her bike for the last 3 months. She told me that there was nothing at curio bay because of the meteorological conditions so I decided not to go and keep going to the next place where I could see penguins, seals and sea lions. I got a couple of cookies from the Japanese girl, we exchange information because she was coming to Auckland and I followed my way to nugget point. There were not so much cars but I was pretty lucky and I get two rides, the second one took me directly to Nugget point even through the 6 km gravel road which leads you to the lighthouse. Even the weather was not good the landscape was impressive. The wind, which was blowing really fast, making difficult even to stand up, so after a few minutes I went back to the place where you could watch penguins just 5 min walking from the car park close to the lighthouse. There was a shed to watch the penguins as they are very shy which was the perfect shelter for me to stay on that night as the weather was really bad and it is always better to sleep dry. People started to arrive around 4.00pm when the penguins come back from fishing in to the beach to get to their nests. A very friendly young couple from England arrived and we were chatting while observing the penguins jump from rock to rock. After refusing sometimes their invitation to offer me 3 dollars to pick me to a campsite with them and then a ride to Dunedin the next day I accepted as I was not sure if they will check the shelter for observing the penguins. In the campground the owner, which was so kind, let me sleep in a shed that was under construction, so I could sleep dry. I had dinner with the English couple and I shared my venison which led to a delightful food. They had a camper van with a bed inside and a small kitchen in the back so after dinner we went inside to watch a movie. That night I had a really nice rest!


Day 11- Nugget Point- Dunedin
The next day they invite us to a wonderful English breakfast and we get on the road. The owner of the campsite also advised us to go to Cannibal Bay, where we will be able to see elephant seals. The weather was still cold, windy and rainy but we arrived to Cannibal Bay where we saw seals and sea lions but not elephant seals. Anyway we kept our way to Dunedin. When we got there we realize that there were not much to do so they ask me to stay with them as they will keep going to Christchurch I did not want to bother them but they insisted so I accepted, I will have company and a ride for the next day. We did some shopping in Dunedin and camp in a campsite outside of the city in the way to Christchurch. It was raining outside and I have already looked for a nice place to sleep under a tree and between the bushes that will cover me so good, but again, so kind of them, they invited me to sleep inside the van, in the front part where the seats are. I did refuse again till they insisted a little. So we had dinner together and watch another movie. That night was not as comfortable as the previous one but at least I was dry.
Day 12- Dunedin- Winchester
We were getting along so well and did a good team so now they asked me for my opinion and whether I wanted to stop in a place or not. I did not want to change their plans so I was always up to everything they propose. We went to Timaru, a city half way between Dunedin and Christchurch. There we did some shopping, fixed the fuses of the car that broke due to an overload, and visit the local museum. Also in the visitor centre they advised us to go to a free campsite an hour away from Christchurch. As I did not have anything to do because I had seen everything I planned, I agree to stay with them another night, and I could get a ride for the next day too. The weather was really bad but we decided to make a fire to get ourselves warm. Luckily I had my survival knife so we started to chop some branches. A man who was walking his dog saw us and came back few minutes later with a box full of dry wood so we could start the fire easily. We had a great night, chatting by the fire and again they asked me to sleep in the van. This night I had already the posture pretty much known so I slept so much better.
Day 13- Winchester- Lake Pukaki
Apparently they were not in a rush so I was not either. They decided to go to Lake Pukaki as they missed that and they did not want to come back because they were going to Christchurch to work to earn a little bit of money before going to Australia for the ski season. As I did not have a place to stay in Christchurch and people told me that there was not much to see due to the earthquake, I decided to go with them and guide them to the very nice spot that the German guy had told me. We got there pretty soon, around 12.00pm but the day was not so good. Too many clouds to see the beauty of that place. As they had check the weather report and was suppose to be sunny in the next morning, we decided to stay there for the night. We did not have anything to do so we started a fire and sit around even when it was raining for almost 12 hours. We were just waiting for the next day to come with the good weather just to see the stoning views.
Day 14- Lake Pukaki- Christchurch
The day woke up still a little bit cloudy but started to clear pretty fast so they could see the wonderful landscape and I could enjoy it one more time. I think I will never get tired of the beauty of that place. So we were heading finally to Christchurch. It took us about 4 hours to get from Lake Pukaki to Christchurch. When we got there we were able to see the truth of all of those scary stories that people told us about the earthquake. You could feel it in the environment, the desolation of the whole city, gravel piles, closed roads, empty buildings cracks in the roads and all kind of damage you can imagine from a very bad and strong earthquake. We went to the information office where we said goodbye and exchange the contact information. There were a very nice couple, so kind and helpful, Thank you! I asked in the information point for all the free activities in the city but as I expected there was not much. Anyway was enough to keep me entertained for the afternoon before going to the airport to expend the night there. I meet a Spanish guy outside the office who was in his honey moon, we chat for a while exchanging our stories and points of view of the country, which were very different.  I went to the museum which was free and surprisingly the building haven’t been damage (or at least apparently). There was a very interesting exhibition of the Antarctic, how was discovered and all the improvement in the techniques. After that I wander around the central mall in the “ground Cero” which was built with shipping containers. Very impressive how the people get so creative to solve problems in hard moments. The wife of the Spanish guy I met in the information point saw me there and offer me money that I refused, but she really insisted to take 5 dollars just to get to the airport, which I finally took. We chat for a while and then she left. I went also to a place which was a bar, exhibition, and concert place at the same which was built with wooden “pallets”. I hanged around the commercial mall which was mostly the only thing around the centre and I had my last dinner there. A mix with all the things left was my menu. I do not know if it was because I was really starving but it tasted really good to me, almost a gourmet meal. With the apple I had left and the flavour of the noodles I did a sauce where I fried the last carrot, and then boiled the rice and the carrot with the sauce, everything together. When the rice was ready I just add the noodles and after these were cooked the mashed potatoes which took the flavour of all the sauce and the spices from the rice. All of this was topped with my last hardboiled egg. Simply delicious!
I took then the bus to the airport and get off one stop before in order to not pay the special rate they have for it and also to stop at McDonalds where I spend all my coins left in 60cent Ice creams. I walked back to the airport where I camped one last time.


Day 15- Christchurch- Auckland

This morning I woke up a little bit rebellious as nobody ask me for my passport or any document in the way there. So I decided to check the security of the airports in New Zealand. I woke up and prepare the stove and start toasting the last 2 bread slices in my pot. Even with the characteristic smell from toast nobody tell me anything about cooking inside the terminal. I was surprised so I decided to go a little bit more in deep in my research and I placed the gas bottle inside the bag in order to see if they will check and remove the dangerous artifact. I leaved it easy to take it so they do not have to mess so much with my stuff. Guess what happened, the gas bottle was intact when I arrived to Auckland. A smile of success and happiness was draw in my face, I had one more very exciting story to tell my future kids, and the most important, I had survived and had a very good time. I have to thank to everyone who helped me to achieve all my goals in this trip and to share your time and stories with me.
Thank you all from the bottom of my heart!


Approximate data from the trip
Total Distance
2170km (1348 miles)
Walked Distance
170km (106 miles)
Walked in tracks and paths
127km (79 miles)
Walked in shoulders
43km (27 miles)
Time
15 days (328 hours)
Money invested
43 NZ$

“It seems to me I spent my life in…

I wrote the Spanish version of my trip and I did not want to be impolite with the English people so I am writing it now in English so you can enjoy it too.
I just finished one of the best experiences of my life. It begun on 7th of April on the way back from a weekend trip when discussing with my friend possible trips in the south island. I was expecting to do this trip in winter so I would have time to save and the whole month to travel but they showed me that maybe many places would be not accessible or very hard to get because of the weather conditions or the amount of snow in the mountains. So I quickly reconsider the trip and decided to do it taking the advantage of the mid semester break, so I will not miss as much class. I started to plan everything and found a cheap flight from Auckland to Christchurch for 126$ with the luggage included. I did not have a tent or a bivouac bag (bivi bag) to get myself covered from the rain so I went to buy one. Finally I decided to get a bivouac because was less weight and easier to transport and to carry it back home.  After buying the plane ticket and the bivi bag I notice that I had expended all the money I had left till the first of May. So my only option was to go to my trip just with the 40$ in cash I had left in my pocket, walking and Hitch hiking.
So I had to plan everything and prepare all my stuff in a bit more than one day. The only big problem was that I had to take all my food for the 14 days I was going to be away in my backpack which made things much heavier.
In order to save weight all my food was dehydrated as rice, mashed potatoes and noodles. I had also cooked 1 egg per day for the whole trip and I had seasoned already the rice so I did not have to bring the spices to the trip. For the breakfast I had oats, tea and lots of sugar. For vitamins I had carrots and apples.
Day 1- Auckland-Christchurch-Arthur’s Pass
So there I was, with my big backpack going into the luggage carousel with the tag of “last bag” as I had to run through the airport to catch the plane. With a smile on my face, the backpack on my back and 30$ in my pocket, I exited the airport. The first thing I needed to was to go buying a gas bottle and some food with the little money I had left. After the shopping my budget was reduced to 10$. I was pretty lucky and Maori guy called Manu, which means bird, gave me a ride even if he had to go in the opposite direction to take me out of the city in order to get better rides. I had no problems with the rides till I pass the last town of the east of the Southern Alps, where I walked a lot without a ride. I was already checking the sides of the road to find a place to crash when I got a ride which brought me just to the place I needed to go, a free campsite in the end of the route I was planning to do the next day. I had some special dinner for the first night as I brought some meat and tomatoes which I could mix with the rice. I could not use the egg I had prepared for that night as a New Zealand parrot called Kea stole it when I was looking in my backpack for some water for cooking.


I got up before the sun and started walking when the sun was burning with its sunshine the marvellous peaks of the Southern Alps. The track was not marked, so it was basically walking up the riverbed which was very rocky. I had to cross the Waimakariri River a couple of times. At this time of the year it is almost dry but still enough water to make it tricky to cross. Probably because I still was a little bit sleepy and I could not think with clarity, I got wet in the first stream I had to cross. I slipped in a rock and my foot went into the water and so I did with the other and I crossed it walking through the water. I kept going and soon I reached the crow river valley where the track was alternating between a wild forest and the rocky riverbed. I was an easy path, sometimes not well marked, that took me to the Crow Hut in about 4 hours, so I was at the hut at roughly 11.30. The only person left in the hut was leaving soon so I will be alone, which was not that bad as I did not had money to pay the hut. Around 12.30 started to pour and it did not stop till the next morning so everything I could do was to light a fire, read some magazines which were in the hut, some yoga, and playing ukulele. Pretty random things! And so I did. The only problem was that the toilet was outside so I had to take a leak from the door of the hut in order to not get wet. Fortunately I had not to go for something bigger.


This was one of the hardest days in my trip and for sure one of the scariest days in my life. The rain stopped just before the sunshine started to illuminate the sky, so I was lucky enough to continue my tramp.  I was exiting the hut at 8.00am and around 8.20am I was at the bottom of a very big scree slope. It was only 1km of distance but had a gradient of 50% as it goes up more than 500m. The route was clearly made to do it in the opposite direction, but as I had no money to stay close to the other end I did it backwards. I started to climb, everything was falling apart and the weight of the backpack did not help to keep my balance. At the beginning the inclination was kind of ok, but a bit before half way it increased considerably and I had to go all the time helping myself with my hands in order to not be another rolling stone downhill. When I was little 200m from the top, I decided to get close to one of the sides as there was not that much looses rocks. Unconsciously I started to climb in the cliff as I was following the path with fewer rocks in the way. After a while I noticed that I was in the cliff about 6m high of the bottom of a small scree slope which ended in another 20m cliff. I was shocked at that very moment. Only 5 meter laterally there was a “safe place” and after thinking in turning around, I determined that was much more difficult. I tried to move, but a couple of times I got myself almost hanging from the cliff due to the rocks falling from my feet. I did not know what to do I was trapped in the cliff and it did not seem to be a very busy route. I was just expecting to fall in my back so the backpack could stop a little bit my fall. After a while I decided to keep going to the safe place, so I climbed very, very slow to not grab one of the falling rocks. I had been climbing a lot before my trip so I felt strong enough to keep going but the backpack was a handicap that I have never had and was disturbing my balance. Finally I could reach the safe edge and take a deep breath before keep going. When I got to the top of the scree slope my heart was pumping hard and my breathing was irregular, and the stunning views did not produce any effect on me till I calmed down. I did it, I survive! I kept going in the path going through the crest of the mountain, now a little more indicated. Once and for all I got to the Avalanche peak were an amazing view delighted me in exchange of the effort done. The way back was not less hard as I had to hurry to try to get to the road soon enough to get a ride to my next destination, Mt Cook. Unfortunately I was not lucky that afternoon and fact that there are no close towns to the village did not help so after 3 hours in the shoulder of the road without getting a ride, I decided to walk back the 10 km that there was from where I was till the free campsite I stayed the night before. This night I was aware about the Keas so I filled my pockets with rocks and let them know that there was no food for them today. They gave up after a few tries to get close end went to bother other campers, so I was happy. The night came and the impressive view of the stars made me sleep so well after the tough day.


Day 4- Arthur’s Pass-Lake Pukaki
I woke up pretty early, so I could walk if I did not get a ride as the day before I was not so lucky. Surprisingly I got a ride with the first car that passed by. The man was a former motorbike gangster who told me some interesting stories about how he could leave the band 30 years ago and not get killed as would have been now a day. He also told me about the jail and gave me some useful tips for life. After a couple of rides from where the gangster a guy who was going from Christchurch to Dunedin for an epic party, apparently 10.000 students in the street. He left me in the shoulder of the junction with the road I had to take to follow my direction with a beer in my hand. I started to walk in my direction in a not very busy road so walked for a while until a man picked me up. He was a dairy farmer, and we had a very nice chat about ourselves. When he dropped me off he told me that apart from dairy farmer he was the Chancellor of the Lincoln University and he offered me money. I refused it as I normally only accept food and drinks but he really insisted so I accepted the 60$ he was giving me (In life you have to be honest but not stupid!). As I knew that I will not have money till first of May and still had to survive in Auckland after I finished my trip I put the money in a “safe pocket” to not expend it. So I thanked him so much and kept going in my way. My plan had changed as in the summit of the Avalanche Peak, a German guy I meet at the top told me to go to a nice spot in Lake Pukaki rather than Lake Tekapo that is the one I had planned. I spend a couple of hours at Lake Tekapo and even if it was a very beautiful place, I decided to keep going to the next one, Lake Pukaki. An old man of 76 years old gave me a ride this time; he was a former climber and guide to go to the top of Mt Cook, the highest peak in New Zealand. He offered me to drive me to my next destination, Mt Cook Village, but I declined it as I was very curious about the very nice spot the German guy told me, and the views were already stunning. The German guy was totally correct, the views from the free campsite were amazing, a beautiful blue lake due to the sediments enclosed in the ice of the glacier which fills the lake, and the highest peak of New Zealand reflecting at the bottom of the lake. All of that was companied with an incredible sunset, and a better star spangled sky!


Day 5- Lake Pukaki-Mueller’s hut-Queenstown
As the night before I woke up with an impressive view of the Mt cook. At 7:00am I was already walking in the road heading Mt Cook Village. I was pretty lucky and just arrive to the junction of the road going there I got picked up by one of the pilots of one of those companies that flies to the glacier and land on it. We had a nice chat and he gave me some tips about the weather and explained me that was getting worst that afternoon. He dropped me just at the beginning of my next route the Muller’s hut.  In the car park I found a dollar! So I started to go up through the around 1800 steps that there is to the top. It took me 2.20h again gaining time to the statistics. When I got to the top I could contemplate the marvellous views from the top where you can see the Lake Pukaki valley, some glaciers and of course the impressive Mt Cook, looking after the Southern Alps. Again the Way back was really tough and the weather was changing. It started to get really, really windy. In the way back I met again the man who gave me a ride the night before, The 76 year old guide. He offered me to give me a ride to a small town in my way to Queenstown and also gave me a couple of beers and a bottle of wine, as he had to take all the things left from a birthday party he had been the night before. There I was again, in the shoulder of the road with my thumb up waiting for the next ride. A very kind American guy, who is working in Afghanistan   gave me the ride to Queenstown and in the way we picked up another two hitch hikers one of them invite me diner in exchange of one of the beers, pretty nice deal. Because they were back from the epic party and were so tired did not want to go out for a while so I hid my backpack in a holiday park I had gate-crashed and went to town with the American guy and the bottle of wine that I had left. We hit a couple of bars till we found one we liked and stayed there for a while. The American guy invited me to pitcher of beer, and we were playing some games and dancing with mostly foreign girls. I went back to the place I have spotted to sleep, a little bit of grass between two trees and two apartments buildings. As the place looked very sheltered and the sky was pretty clear, and I was tired and tipsy, I did not use the bivi bag. That night I felt sleep pretty easily.


Day 6- Queenstown-Routeburn Track
I did not need an alarm that morning as I woke up with the rain hitting my face and feeling cold and wet. Unfortunately, it rained and my sleeping bag got so wet. It was already 7.30 and there was light enough for people to see me sleeping like a homeless in the holiday park so I packed all my things pretty quick except for the sleeping bag that I needed to dry, so I bought a token for the dryer which cost me 4$ for only 30 min, That left me with “only” 5$. I paid expensively for my mistake. I hit the road again, this time pretty late as I had to wait for the sleeping bag to dry a little bit. In 3 rides and about 10km of walking I got to arrive to the beginning of the Routeburn Track. It was 12.30pm very late to start a tramp but I had no choice so I started the Track. It starts in a jungle forest and follows the river upstream through the whole valley. Nice swinging bridges cross the multiple streams that go into the river. As I was already late for the day and because I had no money to pay the huts or the campsites, I had planned to stay in the middle of the track and either use the Harris saddle hut or look for some bivouac rocks that a woman who picked me up recommended me. When I was leaving Routeburn Falls Hut, a Warden from the DOC (Department of Conservation) stopped me in the track and asked me for the ticket for the hut. As I did not have any and did explain him my situation expecting some understanding, he told me that the next free campsite was in Lake Howden Hut about 20km from where I was and it was already 3.00pm. He alerted me not to sleep in the emergency shelter as he was going to check it and that he was calling the warden in Lake Mackenzie to check if he arrive or not. Such a stupid man! So I had no choice, I had to try to walk all the way to pass Lake Mackenzie Hut. In a little more than 3 hours I was already at around Lake Mackenzie hut where I found a nice bivouac rock to sleep. I was already dark and I could not switch on my head lamp as I did not want to attract attention from the wardens in the hut so I just did everything without light, prepared my food and waited till it got really dark to set up my camp. That night I slept a little bit worried about the wardens checking the place.


Day 7- Routeburn track– Te Anau- Kepler Track
Normally I woke up before the sunrise but this day I woke up a little bit earlier just to walk in the dark passing by the hut. I was lucky and nobody saw me so I kept going to the Howden Hut where I stopped to have breakfast and prepare a tea. As it was pretty early and I had time enough I decided to go up to Key Summit where I could contemplate the beautiful landscape of the fjord and some of the Southern Alps Peaks. The Trip to Te Anau was very nice as the man who picked me up was friendly and we had a good chat. I told him about my trip and he told me about how he taught his dog to be a rescue dog. He also gave me a couple of apples! I was expecting to find a free place to sleep in Te Anau but unfortunately when I went to the visitor centre there was no free camping and was prohibited to camp anywhere around the town or the beginning of the track. So again I had no place to sleep. As it was early in the day and I was missing meat so much I decided to go to the supermarket where I bought packed ham and some bread so I could have some proteins. I walked nicely around the lake all the way to the track start. I decided to camp hidden from the track close to the first campsite of the track, about 5 km from the start. I hide between the bushes in the beach in a very nice spot with lake views. When I was just about to start setting up my camp, I saw a DOC boat patrolling the beach so I quickly put everything in my backpack and this on the bushes and taking advantage of my dark clothes I pretend to be a rock so they could not see me. The boat took about 15 min to check the beach and so I was a rock, but the sandflies were biting me all over the uncovered spots of my body, my ankles, my wrist and hands and my face, taking advantage of my rock emulation. Finally they left the beach without knowing that I was there and I could set up my camp and get into the sleeping bag closing it to the top to avoid insect to bite me!
No doubt the hardest day physically! After the Routeburn Track I noticed that was not going to be as easy to sleep in the emergency shelters that there where in the track so I decided to go directly from Brod Bay, where I was, till Shallow Bay in the other lake, 42km away. It was going to be a hard day but I will avoid paying in the huts or in the campgrounds and also from getting caught in the emergency shelters. In order to not be suspicious if got too early to the first hut, I calculated the time to be there in a time that seems reasonable to have been done in the day. I left Brod Bay at 6.30am, so if they ask me, I could say I left at 5.30 from the parking. I arrived to the first hut, around 9.30, made a coffee with a lot of sugar in order to have energy and took a good breakfast. After 20 min of rest I kept going uphill as I could not lose much more time if I wanted to arrive in time to Shallow Bay. It was very cloudy and foggy with not much visibility but finally I crossed the clouds limit and the day was very clear, I was above the clouds. It looked like the clouds were the sea and all the peaks and mountains that were breaking through it seemed to be islands. For one moment I felt like one of the Greek gods in Mount Olympus. After a while in the top of Mt Luxmore I had to move due to my lack of time. The rocky landscape converted back again in the jungle after I got lower than 1200m where the tree line is. At 2.00pm I got to hit the second hut, Iris Burn Hut. Everything was going good but I was starting to feel exhausted. The signpost in the hut was indication 6 hours to the next hut that was close to where the free campsite was, but I needed to do it in four as around 6.30pm it gets dark. So I started walking fast in order to achieve the goal, get there by 6.30pm. Around 4.00pm my feet were totally destroyed, a huge pain was invading my body but my mind still had the control of my body so I had to keep going, I was a little depressed because I expected to get to Rocky Point Shelter, which was in the middle of the way by 4.00pm. I took a 20 min rest to grab some food because I had not eaten anything since 12.30pm and I kept going. Surprisingly the Rocky Point Shelter was 300m far from the point where I had stopped. My moral was mended so I restore my fast rhythm to get to Shallow Bay before it got really dark. At 6.05pm I was already at the last hut, Moturau Hut and the hoped signpost was there reminding me that I still needed to keep going for 35 more minutes, but I was so happy that my body did not hurt anymore, I was that happy that in some moment I just wanted to run all the way just to get there and have that moment I had been waiting so bad to happen, the finish of the journey. By the campsite there was also a basic hut. I check if there was anybody sleeping inside and also the visitors book to check how often the warden came to the hut. I was lucky and also was the middle of the week and the warden will not come till Friday so I was able to stay in the hut without paying. I rest sitting for half an hour and when I tried to stand up my feet were not responding, they had too much for the day so I had to move crawling within the room to prepare my dinner and to start a fire, which was nice to finish drying the sleeping bag. That night I sleep so well!


Day 9- Kepler Track- Invercargill- Fortrose
That morning I was not in a hurry at all so I woke up late made a fire in the beach and had a nice breakfast. I was by the lake and there was some special soap to stop spreading a kind of bacteria from both Islands, so I used it as a gel and had a bath by the lake. There were also two really big tents in the campsite, the only two in there. I saw them the night before but I did not pay much attention, but now I was rested, my curiosity was bigger too so I asked if there was somebody. Nobody answered and the tent seemed abandoned so I open one to check. In the first one there was nothing inside, in the second one there was a very big kitchen set up and some food left. I looked around and picked some minor stuff as cheese 2 cereal bars and mandarins, just enough to complete my diet a little bit and respect the people food. I walked so quietly that morning, it was the first time in the trip that I spent the same amount of time that the one indicated in the signs, even a little bit more. I had finished all my tracks for the trip, now was mainly road and seaside. I got a ride back to Te Anau and another one from Te Anau directly to Invercargill. The man was a hunter and told me that he had to stop to make a couple of jobs before heading to Invercargill. I was not in a rush so I accepted. We stopped in a diary farm and while he was tinting one window to avoid some kind of light reflecting in a camera, I was outside watching how 1000 cows entered in the installations to get rid of their milk. I was so amazed how much milk they can produce in this kind of farms. The man dropped me at the junction of Fortrose road and gave me some fresh venison from his trophy.  From there I got another ride all the way to Fortrose where I was delighted with a marvelous sunset.


Day 10 Fortrose- Nugget Point
Something woke me up, was the raining hitting the bivouac bag. Fortunately I had it this time. I waited a little bit for the rain to easy off in order to pack all my stuff and leave without getting so wet. Luckily it stopped during ten minutes, time enough to get up and pack all my things. It was a very bad day, rainy and cold, but I had to keep going so I started to walk in the shoulder as usual.  I got a ride which took me to the next town in the road where I had breakfast and some tea, covered in a bus stop. I waited a little bit to dry before going again under the rain. In another ride I was in Waikawa the closest town to Curio Bay where I would be able to see penguins and dolphins in the beach. I started to walk the 5km from Waikawa to Curio bay after a while waiting for the rain to easy off. In the middle of the way I met a Japanese girl in her bike. She had been touring with her bike for the last 3 months. She told me that there was nothing at curio bay because of the meteorological conditions so I decided not to go and keep going to the next place where I could see penguins, seals and sea lions. I got a couple of cookies from the Japanese girl, we exchange information because she was coming to Auckland and I followed my way to nugget point. There were not so much cars but I was pretty lucky and I get two rides, the second one took me directly to Nugget point even through the 6 km gravel road which leads you to the lighthouse. Even the weather was not good the landscape was impressive. The wind, which was blowing really fast, making difficult even to stand up, so after a few minutes I went back to the place where you could watch penguins just 5 min walking from the car park close to the lighthouse. There was a shed to watch the penguins as they are very shy which was the perfect shelter for me to stay on that night as the weather was really bad and it is always better to sleep dry. People started to arrive around 4.00pm when the penguins come back from fishing in to the beach to get to their nests. A very friendly young couple from England arrived and we were chatting while observing the penguins jump from rock to rock. After refusing sometimes their invitation to offer me 3 dollars to pick me to a campsite with them and then a ride to Dunedin the next day I accepted as I was not sure if they will check the shelter for observing the penguins. In the campground the owner, which was so kind, let me sleep in a shed that was under construction, so I could sleep dry. I had dinner with the English couple and I shared my venison which led to a delightful food. They had a camper van with a bed inside and a small kitchen in the back so after dinner we went inside to watch a movie. That night I had a really nice rest!


Day 11- Nugget Point- Dunedin
The next day they invite us to a wonderful English breakfast and we get on the road. The owner of the campsite also advised us to go to Cannibal Bay, where we will be able to see elephant seals. The weather was still cold, windy and rainy but we arrived to Cannibal Bay where we saw seals and sea lions but not elephant seals. Anyway we kept our way to Dunedin. When we got there we realize that there were not much to do so they ask me to stay with them as they will keep going to Christchurch I did not want to bother them but they insisted so I accepted, I will have company and a ride for the next day. We did some shopping in Dunedin and camp in a campsite outside of the city in the way to Christchurch. It was raining outside and I have already looked for a nice place to sleep under a tree and between the bushes that will cover me so good, but again, so kind of them, they invited me to sleep inside the van, in the front part where the seats are. I did refuse again till they insisted a little. So we had dinner together and watch another movie. That night was not as comfortable as the previous one but at least I was dry.
Day 12- Dunedin- Winchester
We were getting along so well and did a good team so now they asked me for my opinion and whether I wanted to stop in a place or not. I did not want to change their plans so I was always up to everything they propose. We went to Timaru, a city half way between Dunedin and Christchurch. There we did some shopping, fixed the fuses of the car that broke due to an overload, and visit the local museum. Also in the visitor centre they advised us to go to a free campsite an hour away from Christchurch. As I did not have anything to do because I had seen everything I planned, I agree to stay with them another night, and I could get a ride for the next day too. The weather was really bad but we decided to make a fire to get ourselves warm. Luckily I had my survival knife so we started to chop some branches. A man who was walking his dog saw us and came back few minutes later with a box full of dry wood so we could start the fire easily. We had a great night, chatting by the fire and again they asked me to sleep in the van. This night I had already the posture pretty much known so I slept so much better.
Day 13- Winchester- Lake Pukaki
Apparently they were not in a rush so I was not either. They decided to go to Lake Pukaki as they missed that and they did not want to come back because they were going to Christchurch to work to earn a little bit of money before going to Australia for the ski season. As I did not have a place to stay in Christchurch and people told me that there was not much to see due to the earthquake, I decided to go with them and guide them to the very nice spot that the German guy had told me. We got there pretty soon, around 12.00pm but the day was not so good. Too many clouds to see the beauty of that place. As they had check the weather report and was suppose to be sunny in the next morning, we decided to stay there for the night. We did not have anything to do so we started a fire and sit around even when it was raining for almost 12 hours. We were just waiting for the next day to come with the good weather just to see the stoning views.
Day 14- Lake Pukaki- Christchurch
The day woke up still a little bit cloudy but started to clear pretty fast so they could see the wonderful landscape and I could enjoy it one more time. I think I will never get tired of the beauty of that place. So we were heading finally to Christchurch. It took us about 4 hours to get from Lake Pukaki to Christchurch. When we got there we were able to see the truth of all of those scary stories that people told us about the earthquake. You could feel it in the environment, the desolation of the whole city, gravel piles, closed roads, empty buildings cracks in the roads and all kind of damage you can imagine from a very bad and strong earthquake. We went to the information office where we said goodbye and exchange the contact information. There were a very nice couple, so kind and helpful, Thank you! I asked in the information point for all the free activities in the city but as I expected there was not much. Anyway was enough to keep me entertained for the afternoon before going to the airport to expend the night there. I meet a Spanish guy outside the office who was in his honey moon, we chat for a while exchanging our stories and points of view of the country, which were very different.  I went to the museum which was free and surprisingly the building haven’t been damage (or at least apparently). There was a very interesting exhibition of the Antarctic, how was discovered and all the improvement in the techniques. After that I wander around the central mall in the “ground Cero” which was built with shipping containers. Very impressive how the people get so creative to solve problems in hard moments. The wife of the Spanish guy I met in the information point saw me there and offer me money that I refused, but she really insisted to take 5 dollars just to get to the airport, which I finally took. We chat for a while and then she left. I went also to a place which was a bar, exhibition, and concert place at the same which was built with wooden “pallets”. I hanged around the commercial mall which was mostly the only thing around the centre and I had my last dinner there. A mix with all the things left was my menu. I do not know if it was because I was really starving but it tasted really good to me, almost a gourmet meal. With the apple I had left and the flavour of the noodles I did a sauce where I fried the last carrot, and then boiled the rice and the carrot with the sauce, everything together. When the rice was ready I just add the noodles and after these were cooked the mashed potatoes which took the flavour of all the sauce and the spices from the rice. All of this was topped with my last hardboiled egg. Simply delicious!
I took then the bus to the airport and get off one stop before in order to not pay the special rate they have for it and also to stop at McDonalds where I spend all my coins left in 60cent Ice creams. I walked back to the airport where I camped one last time.


Day 15- Christchurch- Auckland

This morning I woke up a little bit rebellious as nobody ask me for my passport or any document in the way there. So I decided to check the security of the airports in New Zealand. I woke up and prepare the stove and start toasting the last 2 bread slices in my pot. Even with the characteristic smell from toast nobody tell me anything about cooking inside the terminal. I was surprised so I decided to go a little bit more in deep in my research and I placed the gas bottle inside the bag in order to see if they will check and remove the dangerous artifact. I leaved it easy to take it so they do not have to mess so much with my stuff. Guess what happened, the gas bottle was intact when I arrived to Auckland. A smile of success and happiness was draw in my face, I had one more very exciting story to tell my future kids, and the most important, I had survived and had a very good time. I have to thank to everyone who helped me to achieve all my goals in this trip and to share your time and stories with me.
Thank you all from the bottom of my heart!


Approximate data from the trip
Total Distance
2170km (1348 miles)
Walked Distance
170km (106 miles)
Walked in tracks and paths
127km (79 miles)
Walked in shoulders
43km (27 miles)
Time
15 days (328 hours)
Money invested
43 NZ$

“Caminante, son tus huellas el camino y nada más”…

Y así empezaba uno de los poemas más famosos de Antonio Machado y mi viaje.

Como ya os dije el otro día si hace un año me encontraba viviendo en un salón, ahora acabo de llegar de uno de los viajes que probablemente marquen un antes y un después en mi vida. Hace aproximadamente un mes, el 7 de Abril exactamente me encontraba en uno de mis tradicionales fines de semana de explorador por Nueva Zelanda que consisten básicamente en ir con mis amigos de aquí a visitar cualquier lugar cercano a Auckland. Uno de ellos tiene coche y todo se hace más fácil.

Yo tenía planeado ahorrar un poco de dinero y viajar durante un mes en Julio (invierno aquí) y recorrerme la isla sur. Tras un pequeño debate con mis amigos me hicieron ver que en invierno todo va a ser complicado y aunque estemos en otoño que llueve y hace frio todavía no han empezado las nevadas ni las tormentas de una semana. He de decir que me abrieron los ojos porque aunque no me importaba viajar en invierno es mucho más cómodo viajar cuando el tiempo no es tan malo.

Como os he dicho eso fue el 7 de abril, en el viaje de vuelta de una de mis excursiones. En cuanto llegue me puse a buscar las diferentes posibilidades para hacer el viaje y lo más barato que encontré fue un billete de avión a Christchurch desde Auckland por 126$ con el equipaje de 20 kg incluido. Cuando me quise dar cuenta tenía en mi poder un billete de avión para el día 10 de abril y ya era día 8 por la tarde. Me puse enseguida a preparar el equipaje y me di cuenta de que no tenia ningún tipo de refugio para dormir (tienda de campaña, funda vivac, refugio de emergencia) Por lo que decidir ir a comprar uno por si las condiciones empeoraban. Finalmente me decante por la funda vivac (funda impermeable para el saco de dormir, Una tienda de campaña sin mástiles) principalmente por el peso que es de 500g y es fácil de transportar en el avión y dentro del equipaje. 

Al volver a casa me di cuenta de que me había gastado todo mi dinero en el billete y en la funda vivac así que aquí empezó la aventura, una vez más tenía que sobrevivir al sistema sin su mayor exponente la moneda. Me encontraba a tan solo unas horas de la salida de mi avión y solo me quedaban 40$ en efectivo. Rápidamente me puse a preparar la mochila para sobrevivir los 14 días que iba a estar fuera. Uno de los problemas de no tener dinero es que tenía que hacer todo en autoestop, y que tenía planeado hacer varias rutas de montaña de hasta 4 días, lo que significaba estar con la mochila a la espalda durante mucho tiempo, Y necesitaba llevar la comida de todos los días.

 Lo mejor para este tipo de circunstancias es llevar el menor peso posible, que precisamente es bastante complicado, principalmente por la comida. Para ahorrar peso, llevaremos principalmente comida deshidratada que si no comprar las delicatesen que venden para alta montaña (que son bastante caras) Buscaremos comidas tradicionales como pueden ser las lentejas, el arroz, pasta (ocupa más espacio), el puré de patatas en polvo, la leche en polvo, harina, frutos secos, azúcar, fruta deshidratada y demás productos que se os ocurran que no lleven agua. No os aconsejo latas, ya que aunque sean una tentación bastante grande, pesan bastante y no traen tanta comida como parece. 

Consejo: Poner el arroz, el puré de patatas o las legumbres en una bolsa y mezclarlo con las especias que queráis (sal, pimienta, orégano…) y así lo tendréis listo para cocinar y no generareis tanta basura ya que no tenéis que llevar un paquetito de cada cosa. O si no queréis comer todos los días con el mismo aliño ponerlo en una bolsa aparte. También podéis incluir papillas de los niños chicos que están muy ricas aunque son un poco más caras.

Pues lo dicho para 14 días puse en la mochila (2kg aprox) lo siguiente:

-Saco de dormir (2kg), esterilla hinchable (mas cómoda, ligera y menos espacio, 700g) y funda vivac (500g), total 3.2kg

-Ropa: camiseta técnica (licra, polipro, etc), camiseta térmica manga larga, camisa de montaña (algodón), pantalones de caminar, mallas, 3 calcetines, 3 calzoncillos, Chaquetón (2 capas: impermeable y polar (Teoría de las 3 capas))todo esto en una bolsa estanca (para que no se moje), Ropa de abrigo, bragas, guantes y gorro. Peso aproximado: 3kg sin chaquetón.

-Calzado: Botas, zapatillas de deporte ligeras (1kg)

-Utensilios: Navaja, Cuchillo de supervivencia, kit primeros auxilios/supervivencia*, Mechero, infernillo técnico, bombona de gas, olla (aluminio preferiblemente), termo, Cuchara, Papel (libreta) y boli. (3kg)

-Comida: 14 raciones de arroz (medio vaso aprox 120ml) (1kg aprox.), 750g de puré de patatas unas 12 raciones, 12 huevos duros, 750g de Avena (mas de lo que pude soportar, están asquerosas), 14 zanahorias, 7 manzanas, (la fruta es mejor deshidratada como las pasas, dátiles, ciruelas, etc. Pero solo pude llevar lo que tenía en la nevera) Para el primer día tenía un poco de carne picada y 3 tomates. Peso total aproximado 4kg, Mirar consejos sobre el agua
Peso total (en el aeropuerto) 17kg

Día 1- De Christchurch a Arthur’s Pass

Con la etiqueta de “Last Bag” y tras haber corrido por toda la terminal para no perder el vuelo, entraba mi maleta en la cinta de equipaje. Como dijo Cesar al cruzar el rio Rubicón “La suerte está echada”. Con 30 dólares y la mochila a la espalda salía del aeropuerto de Christchurch en una tarde despejada y esplendida. Lo primero que tenía que hacer antes de emprender el viaje era comprar una bombona de gas para el infernillo ya que no me pude traer mi botella en el avión. Así que saque mi pulgar de la manga de la chaqueta y empecé a caminar en dirección al centro comercial más cercano. En menos de una hora estaba listo y un hombre con una furgoneta, Manu, que en Maorí significa Pájaro, me llevo durante 30 km para sacarme de la ciudad y que fuera más cómodo hacer autoestop, incluso yendo en dirección opuesta a la que tenía que ir. Empezaba la tarde a oscurecerse y tenía unas 2 horas para recorrer unos 120km hasta llegar a Arthur’s Pass, un pequeño enclave en una de las principales rutas que cruzan los Alpes del Sur. Me costó 4 viajes y unos cuantos km andados para poder llegar al sitio donde tenía planeado. Acababa de anochecer. Me dispuse a preparar la cena que por ser el primer día era un manjar, arroz con carne y tomates (manjar por lo de la carne y los tomates), y supuestamente tendría que haber llevado huevo duro pero un astuto loro autóctono de Nueva Zelanda el Kea, me lo robo de la mesa en una de las veces que me gire para buscar en la mochila, ¡Malditos Bastardos!



Día 2- Ruta Crow River-Avalanche peak (día 1)

Todavía sin luz a las 5.30 de la mañana suena el despertador y me levanto a preparar mi desayuno y un té con mucho azúcar para el camino, recojo mis cosas tranquilamente y organizo un poco la mochila. Con los primeros rayos de sol iluminando los picos de las montañas circundantes emprendo mi marcha sobre las 6.30. La primera parte del camino transcurre en el cauce del rio Waimakariri, muy pedregoso y con unos cuantos logares donde cruzar el rio. Debía de estar dormido cuando lo cruce porque intentando cruzarlo, me resbale y metí un pie dentro del agua, y ya que estaba pues puse el otro y cruce. Así que si alguna vez os encontráis con un rio no muy profundo, buscar un sitio fácil para pasar o quitaros las botas y mojaros los pies, no hagáis como yo. Pues lo dicho no había pasado ni una hora y ya tenía los dos pies mojados, pero había que seguir el camino. Del pedregoso valle del Waimakariri pasa a un camino que transcurre por un bosque cerrado y muy selvático, casi la jungla, alternando a veces con el también abrupto cauce del rio Crow. Finalmente tras unas 4 horas de caminata llego al ansiado refugio, esperando que no haya nadie para no tener que dormir fuera ya que no tenía dinero para pagarlo. La única persona que quedaba en el refugio estaba prácticamente saliendo cuando yo llegaba. Así que ahí estaba con el refugio para mí solo y sin nada que hacer desde las 11 hasta las 7 de la mañana del día siguiente. Mi único pasatiempo fue el ukelele que llevaba y mantener la estufa de leña a tope para secar las botas y los calcetines. Llovió torrencialmente desde las 13.00 hasta las 6 de la mañana del día siguiente, así que no pude salir a inspeccionar y para no mojarme meaba desde la puerta del refugio, menos mal que no hubo necesidades mayores.

Sin duda uno de los días más duros del viaje y en el que más miedo he pasado. El día pese a la tormenta del día anterior, amanece casi totalmente despejado, así que decido terminar la ruta. Me levante un poco más tarde ese día pero aun así a las 8 conseguí ponerme en marcha y a las 8:20 estaba en la base de un terraplén de unos 1200 metros de longitud y 500 metros de desnivel aproximadamente un 50% de desnivel de media. Lo único que había eran rocas de todos los tamaños colores y formas pero rocas sueltas. Me costó más de 2 horas y un buen susto llegar a la parte de arriba. Cuando estaba a escasos 200m del final del terraplén y cansado de tanta piedra, decidí pegarme a uno de los laterales que era una pared de unos 40m. Inconscientemente y con el propósito de evitar las rocas sueltas empezó a subir por el acantilado hasta que me di cuenta de que estaba prácticamente colgado del acantilado a unos 6 metros de altura de un pequeño terraplén que acababa en un acantilado de unos 20m o así, con la mochila y todo el equipo en la espalda. Solo 5 metros laterales distaban del próximo lugar medianamente seguro y otro 3 del lugar donde venia, pero tras pensar por donde había subido me di cuenta de que probablemente no podría bajar por el lugar por el que venía. Las rocas del acantilado estaban sueltas y en un par de ocasiones las rocas en las que tenia las botas cayeron al vacío en un aparente interminable silencio hasta estallar en el terraplén para unirse a las demás rocas sueltas que lo formaban. No llegue a ver mi vida en 5 segundos como dice la gente pero sí que pensé en muchas cosas muchos recuerdos vinieron a mi mente, estaba casi colapsado y a punto de tirar la toalla y esperar allí a que me recogiera un helicóptero o tener la suerte de caer sobre la mochila. Finalmente y tras unos segundos de meditación, me arme de valor y cuidadosamente seguí avanzando hasta el siguiente lugar seguro. Gracias a que últimamente había estado escalando bastante y me encontraba fuerte pude conseguir llegar al otro extremo que ofrecía un camino menos peligroso hasta la cima del terraplén. Al llegar al final del talud mi corazón latía con fuerza y mi respiración estaba agitada, y el impresionante paisaje que tenia ante mi ni siquiera despertaba un ápice de atención en mi. Tras recuperar durante unos minutos conseguí volver a ponerme en marcha esta vez por un camino algo mas señalizado pero no lo suficiente para no volver a equivocarme y subir a un pico diferente mientras los Keas planeaban a mi alrededor relamiéndose el pico pensando en la próxima comida. Finalmente conseguí conquistar el Avalanche peak desde el cual un suspiro reconfortante salió de mi boca para paralizar el tiempo y el paisaje lleno mis ojos con la importancia que merecía por primera vez en el día.

La bajada no fue menos dura, el cansancio y la fatiga se apoderaban de mi cuerpo y el tiempo me presionaba para intentar llegar a la carretera lo antes posible para poder conseguir un viaje hacia mi próximo destino.

Al llegar a la carretera y tras esperar sin éxito durante 3 horas decidí andar los 10 km que había hasta el lugar donde había dormido el día anterior ya que solo me quedaban 9$ y acampar cerca del pueblo estaba completamente prohibido. Al llegar a la zona de acampada con a noche en los talones de nuevo decidí dormir esta vez completamente a la intemperie, sin ningún refugio para poder contemplar la inmensa cantidad de estrellas que había en el cielo. Nunca antes había visto tantas estrellas ni la vía láctea con tanta nitidez. Dándomelas de perro viejo decidí dejar las cosas claras desde el primer momento con los Keas así que esta vez me llene los bolsillos de piedras y los mantuve a raya hasta que les quedo claro que esa noche no iban a poder conmigo y se fueron a buscar fortuna con otras personas que también acampaban ahí.


Día 4- Arthur’s Pass- Lake Pukaki

Como dice el refrán, “a quien madruga dios le ayuda” y esta vez el primer coche que paso paro, supongo que para mantener la estadística con el día anterior que no pude conseguir ningún viaje. Esta vez era un antiguo gánster motero, de los que van en Harley Davison, y me conto la suerte que tuvo de haber dejado la banda 20 años atrás y mudarse de isla ya que hoy en día lo habrían matado porque sabía demasiadas cosas ilegales. También me conto que había estado en la cárcel y que su hermano todavía seguía en la banda y que no podía dejarla. Un buen hombre que a pesar de su pasado turbio supo salir a tiempo. Después de que un estudiante de la universidad de Lincoln me dejara en el arcén de la intersección con una cerveza en la mano mientras él seguía su camino hacia Dunedin para asistir a una fiesta “épica” en la que las calles se llenan con hasta 10000 estudiantes (cifra impresionante para la población de Nueva Zelanda) me puse a caminar en la dirección que necesitaba tomar para llegar a Lake Pukaki, un enclave único que me había recomendado un alemán que me había encontrado en la cima del Avalanche Peak y gracias al cual cambie mis planes del Lake Tekapo al Lake Pukaki.

Tras un par de kilómetros caminados me recogió un señor también muy agradable y simpático que tenía una granja de lechera, sin embargo también resulto ser el Rector de la misma universidad que el chico que me había dejado poco tiempo atrás. Tras contarle lo corto de mi historia me ofreció dinero insistentemente, el cual rechace y le explique que solo aceptaba comida o bebida. Tras insistirme  varias veces considere que no debía de importarle tanto el dinero y acepte los 60$ que me ofreció (¡hay que ser honrado pero no tonto!) En previsión de que aun me quedarían mínimo 6 días en Auckland hasta volver a tener dinero y que aun tenía 10$ (me encontré un dólar en el arcén) los guarde en el bolsillo de no tocar y seguí mi camino como si nada, “solamente con 10$”. Tuve suerte y en un viaje conseguí llegar hasta Lake Tekapo donde pase unas horas e intente ir a pescar donde me habían dicho pero resulto no ser buena idea ya que no tenia cebo ni plomos y hacía falta una licencia, así que seguí mi camino hasta Lake Pukaki, esta vez con un señor mayor de 76 años que había sido guía de montaña y había estado en el polo sur, y me conto todas sus batallitas. Se ofreció a llevarme hasta mi próximo destino, Mt Cook, pero tenía demasiada curiosidad por ese paraíso del que me habían hablado y lo que había visto hasta entonces no tenia desperdicio. Así que me quede y aproveche para darme el primer baño del viaje en ese lago azulado por los sedimentos que acumula el glaciar que lo alimenta y disfrutar de una impresionante puesta de sol.

Día 5- Lake Pukaki-Mt.Cook(Mueller’s hut)-Queenstown

A la mañana siguiente, como siempre me desperté temprano y anduve 3 km hasta conseguir el primer viaje del día, un piloto de avionetas turísticas de los que aterrizan en los glaciares, que me conto algunas historias y me dio algunos consejos sobre la meteorología de la zona. Como era típico en las rutas que hacia siempre conseguía recortar los tiempos oficiales que anunciaban para la ruta, esta vez más de 1 hora en un recorrido de 3.5h de ida. Conseguí subir los más de 1800 escalones y más de 1000m de altitud que tenía el recorrido hasta llegar al Mueller’s Hut. La bajada al igual que en Avalanche Peak fue bastante dura, pero tuve la suerte de encontrarme de nuevo al señor de 76 años que me había llevado el día anterior hasta Lake Pukaki, con la suerte de que se volvió a ofrecer para llevarme hasta el pueblo más cercano fuera del parque nacional. Casualmente había ido a una fiesta el día anterior en la que habían sobrado muchas cosas y a él le habían tocado las bebidas, así que me volví a encontrar en el arcén con 2 latas de medio litro de cerveza y una botella de vino blanco. Volví a tener suerte en el siguiente viaje con el que conseguí hacer 200km y una cena gratis y un par de cervezas gratis, gracias a un americano que trabaja en Afganistán era el que conducía y otros dos autoestopistas que recogimos en el camino. Uno de los ingleses me invito a cenar y ya que no salían de fiesta (por que venían de la fiesta “épica” en Dunedin) quede con el americano que también me invito a dos trozos de pizza. Tuvimos una charla interesante mientras yo me bebía la cerveza y el vino que me había dado el hombre de 76 y el unas cervezas que se compro. Después de visitar un par de bares conseguimos encontrar uno medianamente bueno en el que me invito a una cerveza de un litro. Como no había ningún sitio donde acampar en la ciudad me cole en un aparcamiento de caravanas y dormí entre dos edificios y dos árboles cerca de donde había escondido la mochila anteriormente. Mire al cielo y viendo que estaba prácticamente resguardado no saque la funda vivac, aunque hubiera llovido esa tarde hacia una noche agradable.

Día 6- Queenstown-Routeburn track (día 1)

Esa mañana no necesite alarma, el frio y las gotas de lluvia que caían en mi cara hicieron el trabajo. Había llovido y todo estaba mojado, el saco y yo que estaba dentro. Ya había luz suficiente para que me vieran así que recogí todo lo más rápido que pude y me gaste 4$ en la secadora del camping para solo media hora de máquina que no consiguió secar todo el saco. Claramente un error que pague bastante caro. Saliendo del camping uno de los vigilantes me paro pero conseguí esquivarlo diciéndole que había venido simplemente a devolverle una cosa a un amigo. Así que me indico la salida y ahí estaba, de nuevo en la carretera tras un fatídico contacto con la ciudad.

Me costó bastante tiempo llegar al punto de partida de mi siguiente ruta ya que estaba bastante alejada de las poblaciones circundantes y era una carretera que acababa en la ruta. Ande unos 7km en total por la carretera y gracias a un par de viajes conseguí llegar al comienzo de la ruta. El único problema que ya eran las 12.00 de la mañana, pero no me quedaba otra opción si no andar. Como siempre mi paso juvenil y acelerado y a pesar de llevar una carga considerable en mi espalda, me permitió recortar el tiempo estimado en una hora aproximadamente. Al llegar a Falls Hut (refugio de montaña), decidí seguir y pasar la noche a mitad de camino ya que me había dicho una señora que me había recogido que había unas piedras buenas para vivaquear. Desgraciadamente poco después de salir del refugio uno de los guardabosques me paro preguntándome por los tickets (Si estás haciendo una ruta de más de un día te obligan a comprar los tickets para quedarte en los refugios o en los campings que tienen en la ruta) que evidentemente no tenia, e intente explicarle mi situación sin decirle donde iba a dormir. Probablemente intuyo mis planes al verme a semejante hora, casi las 15.00, y con todo el equipaje a cuestas, así que me advirtió de que llamaría a los guardias para que patrullaran el camino y revisaran uno de los refugios de emergencia que había a mitad de camino (que era mi segunda opción). No tenia elección debía intentar caminar en menos de 3 horas, ya que solo quedaba ese tiempo de luz,  un recorrido de 6 horas para no estar expuesto a la multa de 500$ que me podía caer por dormir en un sitio no permitido. Me puse en marcha y en poco más de tres horas, me encontraba a escasos metros del segundo refugio, Mackenzie Hut, Escondido tras unas voluminosas rocas que servían también para vivaquear. Sin encender la linterna para no llamar la atención y valiéndome únicamente de la luz ambiental me puse a preparar la cena y el lugar donde iba a dormir, con algo de miedo en el cuerpo por si aparecían los guardabosques.

Día 7- Routeburn track-Te Anau-Kepler Track (día1)

Como de costumbre levantándome antes que nuestro amigo Lorenzo, recogí todo rápido y aproveche la nocturnidad para pasar por delante del refugio y así evitar que me vieran los guardas. Esta vez camine más tranquilo y sin preocupaciones dado que aun era muy pronto para encontrarme a nadie en el camino y que no me quedaba mucho para acabar la ruta. Al llegar a Lake Howden Hut me tome la libertad de entrar y desayunar como uno más, sin el miedo a ser descubierto sin haber pagado (ya que los tickets los piden por la noche). Use el gas y el agua caliente para hacerme uno de mis asquerosos desayunos de avena molida, que viene a ser una pasta asquerosa con grumos y sin apenas un sabor especifico, y también un té. Me tome mi tiempo, y decidí tomar uno de los desvíos que había hasta la cumbre más próxima el “Key Summit”. A eso de las 13.30 me dejaba en Te Anau un señor muy amable que me había dado dos manzanas, me había dicho algunos consejos sobre donde dormir esa noche y me había contado unas cuantas historias interesantes sobre cómo había adiestrado su perro para ser un perro de rescate. Pese a la información que había recopilado indicándome que había un albergue gratuito cerca de la ciudad, al preguntar en información me confirmaron que debía de ser un error del ordenador y básicamente me volvía a quedar otra vez sin un sitio donde dormir, ya que Te Anau es una de las bases de los guardabosques y estaba prohibido acampar y bien patrullado todo el territorio alrededor de la ciudad. Tras meditar las posibilidades y habiéndome informado del único camping gratuito que había en la siguiente ruta, y para hacer un poco de tiempo decidí ir al supermercado a por algo de carne, ya que instintivamente notaba la falta de proteínas tras 6 días comiendo arroz. Me gaste los “últimos” 5$ en medio kilo de carne empaquetada (rollo mortadela) y un paquete de pan de molde, y no pude esperar a comérmelo así que me hice un par de emparedados en la misma puerta del supermercado. Volví a caminar hasta el principio de la siguiente ruta que se encontraba a 5km de la ciudad y otros 5km más hasta Brod Bay el lugar donde pasaría la noche. Este camping no era gratis así que para evitar a los guardabosques de nuevo me escondí en la costa entre matorrales de un metro y con vistas al lago. Era ya casi de noche y estaba a punto de empezar a montar mi campamento cuando me di cuenta de que había un barco de los guardabosques en la costa, así que rápidamente puse todas las cosas dentro de la maleta y aprovechándome del color oscuro de mi ropa y la poca visibilidad que había, me camufle pretendiendo ser una roca. Para mi desgracia el barco iba mucho más lento de lo que yo esperaba, estaban chequeando bastante bien, y la costa estaba llena de unos mosquitos llamados “sandflies” que me acosaban constantemente picándome en las únicas zonas que no tenia cubiertas, los tobillos, las manos y la cara, aprovechándose de mi incapacidad para moverme. Casi 15min duro el “checkeo” de los guardabosques y así mi pequeña tortura. Una vez paso lo único que deseaba era meterme en el saco y la funda vivac, cerrarla hasta arriba y despertar al siguiente día.

Día 8- Kepler Track (día 2)

¡El día más duro de mi viaje! Tras una semana de calentamiento en diferentes rutas de diferentes longitudes venia la prueba final. Tras haber calculado la hora perfecta para empezar a caminar, ya que no quería llegar demasiado pronto al primer refugio para no levantar sospechas, me pongo en marcha sobre las 6:30 de la mañana con un largo día por delante y con la intención de batir mis propios límites. Con la ventaja de que había caminado ya unos 5 km del camino, me puse en marcha y en 2 horas y poco había llegado desde Brod Bay hasta Luxmore Hut donde aproveche para hacer una parada, desayunar, y prepararme un café caliente con mucha, mucha azúcar que había cogido en una cafetería el día anterior, para tener energía para el resto del día, que iba a ser largo. Tras una media hora me puse de nuevo en marcha. Afortunadamente al pasar de los 1200m de altitud aproximadamente cruce las nubes que parecían no acabar y las deje tras de mi pudiendo sentirme como si estuviera en el monte Olimpo con los dioses, un lugar tranquilo, soleado apartado del mundo y por encima de todo. Un mar de nubes que solo se rompía por los grandes picos de los Alpes del sur que formaban las islas y archipiélagos que me rodeaban. Tras volver a bajar al mundo real, buceando en el mar de nubes, te introducías directamente en un clima totalmente selvático que de no haber sabido que estaba en Nueva Zelanda habría pensado que estoy en algún punto selvático cerca del ecuador como Colombia. Sobre las 14.00 de la tarde ya había alcanzado Iris Burn Hut donde prácticamente descanse un poco y aproveche para llenar un poco la botella de agua. El cansancio empezaba a apoderarse de mí, mi mente se mantenía fuerte y mis músculos aun podían tirar de mi cuerpo pero mis pies empezaban a sentir el exceso de peso y pasos. Me quedaban apenas 4 horas y media de luz y aun tenía que recorrer unos 19km. Sin pensarlo dos veces me puse de nuevo en marcha intentando ser constante y en las subidas apretar bien el paso para poder ganarle tiempo a las señales que me decían que aun quedaba 6 horas para llegar, tiempo que yo no tenía. De nuevo me encontré con una guardabosques, esta vez ya no pensaba parar y menos con el tiempo que me quedaba así que a pesar de que me hablo y le contesté, seguí andando en mi dirección (contraria a la que ella iba) y no le quedo otra alternativa que seguirme si quería intentar obtener información. Le explique mi situación y que estaba haciendo la ruta en un día, ya que le dije que había empezado en el aparcamiento, se asombro por que llevaba la mochila con todas las cosas y no termino de creerme así que empezó a hacerme un cuestionario sobre donde había dormido y donde pensaba dormir. Le dije que ya encontraría un sitio cuando llegara a Rainbow Reach y que no se lo diría para que no viniera a buscarme, y solté una carcajada irónica. Quizás por el ritmo que llevaba, por que iba en dirección opuesta a la suya o por que no le di la información que buscaba, finalmente se dio por vencida y siguió su camino. Me había librado de la guardabosques sin mucho problema, todo iba bien. Tras 2 horas sin haber llegado a Rocky point Shelter me entro el bajón y decidí hacer un descanso de 20 minutos para que mis pies descansaran y comer algo y tomar un poco de café, ya que solo había comido un par de emparedados hacia más de 4 horas. Tras recomponerme un poco, seguí caminando y para mi sorpresa había parado a escasos 500m de Rocky Point Shelter, el punto intermedio entre Iris Burn Hut y Moturau Hut. Eso significaba que estaba en buen camino, que podría llegar a mi destino antes de que anocheciera, y me dio fuerzas para continuar mi camino a un buen ritmo. La noche se me echaba encima, los pies me ardían y la fatiga se empezaba apoderar de mí, aunque aun podía controlarlos con mi mente, el gran poder de la mente, que lleva el cuerpo a límites insospechados. Todavía no había llegado a Moturau Hut y sabia que desde ahí todavía me quedarían unos 3 km hasta el camping donde quería llegar. Empecé a ojear el entorno por si podía quedarme a dormir en algún punto del camino, mi cuerpo quería parar pero mi mente no le dejaba, debíamos llegar hasta el final. Finalmente a eso de las 18.00  logre ver el refugio y la indicación que había en la entrada donde estaban escritos los tiempos a cada lugar, Shallow Bay 35min. Media hora más de camino que parecía una bendición después de todo el día caminando, la emoción por llegar me hacia andar rápido y a veces sentía casi ganas de correr solo por llegar y poder sentarme quitarme la mochila y suspirar profundamente en el final de la jornada. Después de 12 horas caminando rápido (contando las paradas; 1hora y media aproximadamente) había logrado el objetivo, había conseguido hacer los 42km que distaban entre Brod Bay y Shallow Bay, con unos 15kg a la espalda.

A parte de la zona de acampada había un refugio de lo que no tienen guardabosques dentro y en el que no había nadie esa noche, chequee el libro de visitas para saber con qué frecuencia pasaba el guardia y con qué frecuencia había gente allí. Había entradas de hacia 3 o 4 años así que no debía de ser un problema el pasar la noche allí sin pagar. Después de haber estado sentado durante media hora descansando y revisando el libro de visitas me dispuse a ir a por leña para encender un fuego en la maravillosa chimenea del refugio, sin embargo al ir a levantarme mis pies no tenían fuerzas para sustentar mi cuerpo, había sido una largo día para ellos, así que tuve que gatear y arrastrarme moverme dentro del refugio. Ese día tuve una cena especial, una combinación de todo lo que tenia: arroz, manzana, puré de patatas, y fideos chinos (noodles) que la verdad no sé si era por el hambre o mi habilidad mi tolerancia con la mayoría de los alimentos lo encontré exquisito, muy cerca de plato de restaurante.


Día 9- Kepler track-Invercargill-Fortrose

El día siguiente me lo tome con más tranquilidad ya que le había ganado un día a la planificación, así que me prepare el desayuno, encendí un fuego en la playa y me di un baño en el lago, el segundo. También había jabón en el refugio así que aproveche para usarlo y para limpiarme una rozadura del pie que se me había infectado un par de días atrás y que por desgracia no había podido limpiar más que con suero por que la crema antibiótica y el betadine que tenia habían caducado y los había tirado antes de empezar para no llevar más peso de la cuenta. En el camping había dos tiendas enormes como si fueran de circo que parecían abandonadas, ya las había visto la noche anterior pero estaba tan cansado que ni les había prestado atención. La curiosidad empezó a crecer y empecé a gritar preguntado si había alguien. Solo la brisa y algún pájaro exótico contesto, así que me dispuse a investigar. Al abrir la primera encontré que no había nada dentro, así que me dirigí a la segunda, en esta si había cosas, habían montado como una cocina dentro y parecía que no había habido gente en los últimos 2 días, eche un vistazo por encima y me tome la libertad de coger algunos suplementos para mi dieta, un poco de queso, un par de barritas de cereales, unas galletas y unas cuantas mandarinas, nada en abundancia. La suerte me acompañaba de nuevo y justo cuando salía de la bahía, una barca llegaba a la playa donde se encontraba el camping. Tras acabar la ruta en Rainbow Reach volví a la carretera para alejarme de los Alpes del Sur y dirigirme a la costa sudeste. Por suerte para mis pies, las grandes rutas se habían acabado y ahora solo me esperaban kilómetros de asfalto con el dedo gordo apuntando al cielo.

Un viaje hasta Te Anau y desde allí pude conseguir uno directo hasta Invercargill aunque con algunas paradas. Un cazador que volvía a casa y que tenía que hacer un par de trabajillos por el camino. Tras una hora de camino, paramos en una lechería para que tintara unos cristales que reflejaban luz en una cámara, mientras tanto yo me dedique a ver como 1000 vacas entraban en la central para ser ordeñadas y me pregunte cuantos litros de leche se sacarían a la semana ya que las ordeñan 2 veces al día durante todos los días del año. No llegue a ninguna conclusión pero me dedique a observarlas y a disfrutar del buen tiempo que me acompañaba. Al llegar a Invercargill había hecho una nueva adquisición, venado, carne de ciervo recién cazada que me había dado el cazador que me había recogido. Le di las gracias y continúe mi camino para alejarme de la “gran” ciudad, ya había comprobado que no es fácil sobrevivir en las ciudades sin dinero. Me dirigí a Fortrose, un pequeño pueblo en el comienzo de la costa sudeste denominada “The Catlins” donde me esperaban pingüinos, delfines, focas y leones marinos acompañanados de los impresionantes paisajes marinos de la zona. Y esa noche disfrute de una impresionante puesta de sol en la playa y un magnifico cielo estrellado.

Día 10- Fortrose-Nugget point

No necesite alarma esa mañana ya que me desperté con el “claqueteo” de la lluvia golpeando contra la funda vivac. Afortunadamente esta vez la tenía puesta. Me quede un rato ahí dentro esperando que la lluvia amainara un poco para mojarme lo menos posible. Afortunadamente, paro, y en menos de diez minutos ya había recogido todo el equipaje y estaba en la carretera. Tiempo justo para no mojarme ya que empezó a llover de nuevo. Fui a la única tienda del pueblo para que me rellenaran la botella de agua y me eche de nuevo a la carretera. Tras unos 5 km andados pude conseguir un viaje que me llevo hasta el siguiente pueblo donde resguardado en una parada de autobús aproveche para desayunar, hacerme un té y secarme un poco antes de volver bajo la lluvia a esperar fortuna. En menos de 2km había conseguido otro viaje que me llevo hasta Waikawa, a solo 6km de Curio Bay mi primer destino en Catlins donde podría ver delfines surfeando en las olas y pingüinos. Entre en el museo gratuito del pueblo para esperar que amainara un poco y para secarme y aproveche para ver la cantidad de artilugios de hace 2 o 3 siglos que tienen aquí de cuando colonizaron la isla. A mitad de camino de Curio Bay me encontré con una japonesa que iba en bicicleta y me dijo que no había ni delfines ni pingüinos, que era un mal día para ir. Charlamos un rato mientras volvíamos a Waikawa y me dio un par de riquísimas galletas. En tan solo dos viajes me había plantado en Nugget Point donde tenía planeado pasar la noche, el mal tiempo no acompañaba y no había muchos coches en la carretera así que iba a tener que andar mas a partir de ahora. Me acerqué al faro y la fuerza del viento golpeo mi cara al asomarme al mirador. Tenía que agarrarme a la barandilla para no perder el equilibrio. El buen tiempo que me había acompañado hasta ahora se había acabado y a pesar de que los días serian menos duros físicamente lo serian más moralmente. Volví a la bahía donde había un refugio que servía para observar los pingüinos. Eran las 16:00 de la tarde, así que decidí esperar por si venia gente y pasar la noche allí, así por lo menos estaría resguardado del viento y de la lluvia. Mientras tanto me dedique a mirar los pingüinos y su graciosa forma de andar. Empezó a llegar gente ya que era la hora en la que los pingüinos salen del agua después de haber estado pescando todo el día para volver a sus nidos. Apareció una pareja de Inglaterra que había estado viajando y estuvimos charlando mientras veíamos como los pingüinos saltaban de piedra en piedra con dificultades para llegar a sus nidos. Les conté mi historia y se ofrecieron a llevarme a un camping al que iban a ir y darme los 3$ que me faltaban y al día siguiente llevarme a Dunedin que era mi próximo objetivo. Tras un pequeño debate acepte su hospitalidad y fuimos al camping donde el dueño me dejo dormir en un cobertizo en obras para protegerme de la lluvia. Compartí mi carne de venado con ellos y tuvimos una deliciosa cena dentro de su furgoneta y después vimos una película, todo comodidades después de lo que me esperaba.


Día 11- Nugget point- Dunedin

Tengo que decir que se duerme muy bien cuando estas bajo techo, solo la sensación de no despertarte con el saco mojado por la humedad te da energías para empezar el día. Tras un desayuno ingles que me invitaron nos pusimos en marcha siguiendo los consejos del dueño del camping para ir a Cannibal Bay donde podríamos ver elefantes marinos, leones marinos y focas, finalmente solo conseguimos ver los dos últimos, y después nos pusimos en camino a Dunedin. Una vez en la ciudad nos dimos cuenta que no había mucho que ver o hacer allí, pero me ofrecieron quedarme con ellos y al día siguiente partir hacia Christchurch, mi destino final. A mí no me importo ya que tenía el viaje asegurado y había visto todo lo que tenía que ver. Les explique que no quería ser una molestia pero de nuevo insistieron en que me quedara con ellos así que no tuve más remedio que aceptar. Fueron de compras y yo me dedique a ser su perrito faldero pero era cómodo, no tenía que llevar mi mochila a cuestas ni preocuparme por conseguir un viaje. En cuanto terminaron las compras salimos de la ciudad y nos dirigimos a un camping que estaba en las afueras de camino a Christchurch. De nuevo vimos una película y esta vez como estaba lloviendo me ofrecieron quedarme en la parte de delante de la furgoneta. Tras rechazar la invitación numerosas veces y que me lo pidieran incansablemente acepte, total era un sitio seco, lo único que no quería es molestar. Así que vimos otra película y me dieron chocolate, un producto que no había probado desde España.

Día 12- Dunedin- Winchester

Después de esos dos días nos habíamos tomado cariño mutuamente así que ya me incluían en sus planes con toda normalidad e incluso me preguntaban si yo quería hacer esto o lo otro. Yo siempre me abstenía y ellos siempre estaban de acuerdo así que era una perfecta simbiosis. Paramos en Timaru, una ciudad a mitad de camino entre Dunedin y Christchurch. Fuimos al museo al supermercado y en la oficina de información nos dijeron un sitio donde podíamos acampar gratis que estaba a una hora y media de Christchurch. Yo no tenía prisa por llegar y ellos tampoco así que volví a pasar otra noche con ellos, de todas formas no tenia sitio donde dormir en Christchurch y ya sabéis que las ciudades no es un buen sitio para estar sin dinero. Esta vez pese a que estaba lloviendo intentamos hacer un fuego para calentarnos así que comenzamos a cortar leña, menos mal que siempre llevo el cuchillo de supervivencia para estos casos. Tuvimos suerte y un hombre que estaba paseando a su perro nos vio y nos trajo leña seca por lo que se hizo más fácil empezar el fuego, y así tuvimos un maravilloso fuego donde sentarnos a contar historias como si de una acampada de colegio se tratara. Esta vez no hubo película pero volví a dormir en la furgoneta seco que siempre es agradable además ya había cogido la postura y dormía del tirón, con una pierna entre el volante y rodeando la palanca de cambios con la rodilla.

Día 13- Winchester-Lake Pukaki

Al parecer no tenían tanta prisa en llegar a Christchurch y como les había hablado maravillas de Lake Pukaki, decidieron ir allí antes de ir a Christchurch para no tener que volver, ya que ellos se quedaban allí trabajando antes de irse a Australia a hacer la temporada de invierno en una estación de esquí. De nuevo no me importo compartir trayecto con ellos pese a haber estado ya en el lugar, pero de nuevo no tenia sitio donde quedarme y me habían dicho que Christchurch se podía ver en unas cuantas horas. El día no acompañaba para disfrutar de las vistas como se merecía pero habían mirado el tiempo y a la mañana siguiente estaría despejado. El día transcurrió prácticamente alrededor de un fuego que empezamos y que duro casi 12 horas hasta que nos acostamos.

Día 14- Lake Pukaki- Christchurch

La mañana se despertó despejada y aunque fue un poco tímido el Mt Cook asomo su impresionante cima y el cuento se hizo realidad. Nos pusimos en marcha bastante rápido ya que había que llegar a Christchurch que aun estaba a unas 4 horas de camino. Al llegar allí pudimos ver la dura mano de la naturaleza, como el simple movimiento de la tierra generado por un terremoto puede acabar con una ciudad. La mayoría de las calles estaban en obras, cerradas, grúas por todas partes y montañas de escombros. Las calles mostraban grietas por todas partes, las aceras eran irregulares cuando había y un ambiente de decadencia rodeaba la ciudad. Llego el momento de la despedida. Les agradecí una y mil veces todo lo que habían hecho por mí, les di mi dirección de correo y mi teléfono por si venían a Auckland, y nos deseamos suerte mutuamente. Volvía a estar solo tras unos excitantes días en compañía, pero en cierto modo anhelaba esa soledad, esa libertad de poder dirigirte a cualquier sitio sin tener que dar explicaciones o simplemente quedarte callado para escuchar el mundo moviéndose a tu alrededor. Tenía ganas de explorar por mi cuenta así que pedí un mapa en la oficina de turismo y pregunte por todas las actividades gratuitas que había en la ciudad. Fui al museo que sorprendentemente y pese al aspecto antiguo que tenía, no había sido dañado y estaba abierto al público. La exposición que más me impacto fue la de los viajes a la Antártida y al polo sur y toda la historia que hay sobre ello. Después me dirigí a la principal atracción de la ciudad, el centro comercial que han construido en el centro con contenedores de los barcos, y es realmente impresionante lo bien  que lo han hecho y lo conseguido que esta. Aquí la mujer de un español con el que había estado hablando en la puerta de la oficina de información, vino por qué me estaba buscando para darme dinero. De nuevo lo rechace pero insistió en que aceptara al menos el dinero del autobús al aeropuerto. Estuvimos charlando un rato y me conto como les había ido su luna de miel, y yo le conté como había ido mi viaje, un rápido intercambio de historias y claramente dos puntos de vista diferentes. Ellos estaban “cansados de tanta naturaleza” y yo estaba “cansado de tanta ciudad”

La siguiente atracción y la última que había en el centro era un bar, sala de exposiciones y de conciertos que habían construido con pales de madera apilados. Estaba bastante conseguido. Y pensé “Es impresionante la capacidad creativa humana como crece cuando menos recursos hay”. Luego volví al centro comercial de contenedores y me hice, la ultima cena, un revuelto de todo lo que me quedaba que de nuevo me pareció una especialidad gourmet. Poche las manzanas con los polvos de los fideos, freí las zanahorias y lo poco que quedaba de la mortadela. Coci el arroz con piri-piri y la salsa que se había creado y con el caldo sobrante hice el puré y los fideos, todo en la misma olla. ¡Vaya cena propia de un final feliz!

De camino al aeropuerto pare en el McDonald para gastarme los pocos céntimos que me habían sobrado del dinero que me había dado la española en un par de helados de 60centimos. Y de nuevo tuve suerte al encontrar mantequilla y mermelada para mis dos últimas rebanadas de pan que tenia guardadas para antes de montarme en el avión. Después tranquilamente camine hasta el aeropuerto y volví a montar mi campamento una vez más.


Día 15- Christchurch- Auckland

Me desperté a las 5 ya que el avión salía a las 6.30 de la mañana y me desperté rebelde. Ya que no me habían pedido el pasaporte, DNI o carnet de conducir en el vuelo de ida, decidí examinar la seguridad de los aeropuertos en Nueva Zelanda. Lo primero que hice fue prepararme el desayuno, un par de tostadas y té, para lo que necesite encender el infernillo en medio de la terminal para mis tostadas. No recibí ninguna amonestación y a nadie pareció importarle el olor a quemado característico de unas tostadas cuando se hacen en una olla. Estaban deliciosas por cierto. Decidí arriesgarme un poco más y deje la bombona de gas dentro del equipaje facturado, cosa que está totalmente prohibida. Fui un poco precavido y la deje a mano por si me registraban la mochila que no tardara mucho en salir. La segunda vez no me sorprendió pero no me pidieron ningún tipo de identificación ni en el check-in ni en el control de seguridad y el billete solo me lo pidieron en el avión para sentarme. Lo que si me esperaba es que me registraran la mochila pero de nuevo sorpresa, la mochila estaba intacta y con la botella de gas dentro. Una sonrisa se dibujo en mi cara, había llegado a casa podría dormir en una cama después de 14 días y comer carne y verduras que las echaba de menos y lo mejor de todo que aun tenía el dinero que me habían dado para sobrevivir hasta mayo. El viaje había sido todo un éxito.

Quiero agradecer a todas las personas que me han ayudado en este viaje por haberlo hecho de esa forma tan cariñosa y desinteresada, y por compartir sus historias y su tiempo conmigo. A todos ellos, ¡Mil Gracias!

Caminate, son tus huellas
el camino y nada más;
Caminante, no hay camino,
se hace camino al andar.
Al andar se hace el camino,
y al volver la vista atrás
se ve la senda que nunca
se ha de volver a pisar.
Caminante no hay camino
sino estelas en la mar.
(Antonio Machado)



  
Datos del Viaje (Aproximados):
Distancia total recorrida
2170km
Distancia total andada
170km
Distancia andada en carretera
43km
Distancia en rutas y senderos
127km
Tiempo invertido
15 días (328h)
Dinero invertido
45$


“Caminante, son tus huellas el camino y nada más”…

Y así empezaba uno de los poemas más famosos de Antonio Machado y mi viaje.

Como ya os dije el otro día si hace un año me encontraba viviendo en un salón, ahora acabo de llegar de uno de los viajes que probablemente marquen un antes y un después en mi vida. Hace aproximadamente un mes, el 7 de Abril exactamente me encontraba en uno de mis tradicionales fines de semana de explorador por Nueva Zelanda que consisten básicamente en ir con mis amigos de aquí a visitar cualquier lugar cercano a Auckland. Uno de ellos tiene coche y todo se hace más fácil.

Yo tenía planeado ahorrar un poco de dinero y viajar durante un mes en Julio (invierno aquí) y recorrerme la isla sur. Tras un pequeño debate con mis amigos me hicieron ver que en invierno todo va a ser complicado y aunque estemos en otoño que llueve y hace frio todavía no han empezado las nevadas ni las tormentas de una semana. He de decir que me abrieron los ojos porque aunque no me importaba viajar en invierno es mucho más cómodo viajar cuando el tiempo no es tan malo.

Como os he dicho eso fue el 7 de abril, en el viaje de vuelta de una de mis excursiones. En cuanto llegue me puse a buscar las diferentes posibilidades para hacer el viaje y lo más barato que encontré fue un billete de avión a Christchurch desde Auckland por 126$ con el equipaje de 20 kg incluido. Cuando me quise dar cuenta tenía en mi poder un billete de avión para el día 10 de abril y ya era día 8 por la tarde. Me puse enseguida a preparar el equipaje y me di cuenta de que no tenia ningún tipo de refugio para dormir (tienda de campaña, funda vivac, refugio de emergencia) Por lo que decidir ir a comprar uno por si las condiciones empeoraban. Finalmente me decante por la funda vivac (funda impermeable para el saco de dormir, Una tienda de campaña sin mástiles) principalmente por el peso que es de 500g y es fácil de transportar en el avión y dentro del equipaje. 

Al volver a casa me di cuenta de que me había gastado todo mi dinero en el billete y en la funda vivac así que aquí empezó la aventura, una vez más tenía que sobrevivir al sistema sin su mayor exponente la moneda. Me encontraba a tan solo unas horas de la salida de mi avión y solo me quedaban 40$ en efectivo. Rápidamente me puse a preparar la mochila para sobrevivir los 14 días que iba a estar fuera. Uno de los problemas de no tener dinero es que tenía que hacer todo en autoestop, y que tenía planeado hacer varias rutas de montaña de hasta 4 días, lo que significaba estar con la mochila a la espalda durante mucho tiempo, Y necesitaba llevar la comida de todos los días.

 Lo mejor para este tipo de circunstancias es llevar el menor peso posible, que precisamente es bastante complicado, principalmente por la comida. Para ahorrar peso, llevaremos principalmente comida deshidratada que si no comprar las delicatesen que venden para alta montaña (que son bastante caras) Buscaremos comidas tradicionales como pueden ser las lentejas, el arroz, pasta (ocupa más espacio), el puré de patatas en polvo, la leche en polvo, harina, frutos secos, azúcar, fruta deshidratada y demás productos que se os ocurran que no lleven agua. No os aconsejo latas, ya que aunque sean una tentación bastante grande, pesan bastante y no traen tanta comida como parece. 

Consejo: Poner el arroz, el puré de patatas o las legumbres en una bolsa y mezclarlo con las especias que queráis (sal, pimienta, orégano…) y así lo tendréis listo para cocinar y no generareis tanta basura ya que no tenéis que llevar un paquetito de cada cosa. O si no queréis comer todos los días con el mismo aliño ponerlo en una bolsa aparte. También podéis incluir papillas de los niños chicos que están muy ricas aunque son un poco más caras.

Pues lo dicho para 14 días puse en la mochila (2kg aprox) lo siguiente:

-Saco de dormir (2kg), esterilla hinchable (mas cómoda, ligera y menos espacio, 700g) y funda vivac (500g), total 3.2kg

-Ropa: camiseta técnica (licra, polipro, etc), camiseta térmica manga larga, camisa de montaña (algodón), pantalones de caminar, mallas, 3 calcetines, 3 calzoncillos, Chaquetón (2 capas: impermeable y polar (Teoría de las 3 capas))todo esto en una bolsa estanca (para que no se moje), Ropa de abrigo, bragas, guantes y gorro. Peso aproximado: 3kg sin chaquetón.

-Calzado: Botas, zapatillas de deporte ligeras (1kg)

-Utensilios: Navaja, Cuchillo de supervivencia, kit primeros auxilios/supervivencia*, Mechero, infernillo técnico, bombona de gas, olla (aluminio preferiblemente), termo, Cuchara, Papel (libreta) y boli. (3kg)

-Comida: 14 raciones de arroz (medio vaso aprox 120ml) (1kg aprox.), 750g de puré de patatas unas 12 raciones, 12 huevos duros, 750g de Avena (mas de lo que pude soportar, están asquerosas), 14 zanahorias, 7 manzanas, (la fruta es mejor deshidratada como las pasas, dátiles, ciruelas, etc. Pero solo pude llevar lo que tenía en la nevera) Para el primer día tenía un poco de carne picada y 3 tomates. Peso total aproximado 4kg, Mirar consejos sobre el agua
Peso total (en el aeropuerto) 17kg

Día 1- De Christchurch a Arthur’s Pass

Con la etiqueta de “Last Bag” y tras haber corrido por toda la terminal para no perder el vuelo, entraba mi maleta en la cinta de equipaje. Como dijo Cesar al cruzar el rio Rubicón “La suerte está echada”. Con 30 dólares y la mochila a la espalda salía del aeropuerto de Christchurch en una tarde despejada y esplendida. Lo primero que tenía que hacer antes de emprender el viaje era comprar una bombona de gas para el infernillo ya que no me pude traer mi botella en el avión. Así que saque mi pulgar de la manga de la chaqueta y empecé a caminar en dirección al centro comercial más cercano. En menos de una hora estaba listo y un hombre con una furgoneta, Manu, que en Maorí significa Pájaro, me llevo durante 30 km para sacarme de la ciudad y que fuera más cómodo hacer autoestop, incluso yendo en dirección opuesta a la que tenía que ir. Empezaba la tarde a oscurecerse y tenía unas 2 horas para recorrer unos 120km hasta llegar a Arthur’s Pass, un pequeño enclave en una de las principales rutas que cruzan los Alpes del Sur. Me costó 4 viajes y unos cuantos km andados para poder llegar al sitio donde tenía planeado. Acababa de anochecer. Me dispuse a preparar la cena que por ser el primer día era un manjar, arroz con carne y tomates (manjar por lo de la carne y los tomates), y supuestamente tendría que haber llevado huevo duro pero un astuto loro autóctono de Nueva Zelanda el Kea, me lo robo de la mesa en una de las veces que me gire para buscar en la mochila, ¡Malditos Bastardos!



Día 2- Ruta Crow River-Avalanche peak (día 1)

Todavía sin luz a las 5.30 de la mañana suena el despertador y me levanto a preparar mi desayuno y un té con mucho azúcar para el camino, recojo mis cosas tranquilamente y organizo un poco la mochila. Con los primeros rayos de sol iluminando los picos de las montañas circundantes emprendo mi marcha sobre las 6.30. La primera parte del camino transcurre en el cauce del rio Waimakariri, muy pedregoso y con unos cuantos logares donde cruzar el rio. Debía de estar dormido cuando lo cruce porque intentando cruzarlo, me resbale y metí un pie dentro del agua, y ya que estaba pues puse el otro y cruce. Así que si alguna vez os encontráis con un rio no muy profundo, buscar un sitio fácil para pasar o quitaros las botas y mojaros los pies, no hagáis como yo. Pues lo dicho no había pasado ni una hora y ya tenía los dos pies mojados, pero había que seguir el camino. Del pedregoso valle del Waimakariri pasa a un camino que transcurre por un bosque cerrado y muy selvático, casi la jungla, alternando a veces con el también abrupto cauce del rio Crow. Finalmente tras unas 4 horas de caminata llego al ansiado refugio, esperando que no haya nadie para no tener que dormir fuera ya que no tenía dinero para pagarlo. La única persona que quedaba en el refugio estaba prácticamente saliendo cuando yo llegaba. Así que ahí estaba con el refugio para mí solo y sin nada que hacer desde las 11 hasta las 7 de la mañana del día siguiente. Mi único pasatiempo fue el ukelele que llevaba y mantener la estufa de leña a tope para secar las botas y los calcetines. Llovió torrencialmente desde las 13.00 hasta las 6 de la mañana del día siguiente, así que no pude salir a inspeccionar y para no mojarme meaba desde la puerta del refugio, menos mal que no hubo necesidades mayores.

Sin duda uno de los días más duros del viaje y en el que más miedo he pasado. El día pese a la tormenta del día anterior, amanece casi totalmente despejado, así que decido terminar la ruta. Me levante un poco más tarde ese día pero aun así a las 8 conseguí ponerme en marcha y a las 8:20 estaba en la base de un terraplén de unos 1200 metros de longitud y 500 metros de desnivel aproximadamente un 50% de desnivel de media. Lo único que había eran rocas de todos los tamaños colores y formas pero rocas sueltas. Me costó más de 2 horas y un buen susto llegar a la parte de arriba. Cuando estaba a escasos 200m del final del terraplén y cansado de tanta piedra, decidí pegarme a uno de los laterales que era una pared de unos 40m. Inconscientemente y con el propósito de evitar las rocas sueltas empezó a subir por el acantilado hasta que me di cuenta de que estaba prácticamente colgado del acantilado a unos 6 metros de altura de un pequeño terraplén que acababa en un acantilado de unos 20m o así, con la mochila y todo el equipo en la espalda. Solo 5 metros laterales distaban del próximo lugar medianamente seguro y otro 3 del lugar donde venia, pero tras pensar por donde había subido me di cuenta de que probablemente no podría bajar por el lugar por el que venía. Las rocas del acantilado estaban sueltas y en un par de ocasiones las rocas en las que tenia las botas cayeron al vacío en un aparente interminable silencio hasta estallar en el terraplén para unirse a las demás rocas sueltas que lo formaban. No llegue a ver mi vida en 5 segundos como dice la gente pero sí que pensé en muchas cosas muchos recuerdos vinieron a mi mente, estaba casi colapsado y a punto de tirar la toalla y esperar allí a que me recogiera un helicóptero o tener la suerte de caer sobre la mochila. Finalmente y tras unos segundos de meditación, me arme de valor y cuidadosamente seguí avanzando hasta el siguiente lugar seguro. Gracias a que últimamente había estado escalando bastante y me encontraba fuerte pude conseguir llegar al otro extremo que ofrecía un camino menos peligroso hasta la cima del terraplén. Al llegar al final del talud mi corazón latía con fuerza y mi respiración estaba agitada, y el impresionante paisaje que tenia ante mi ni siquiera despertaba un ápice de atención en mi. Tras recuperar durante unos minutos conseguí volver a ponerme en marcha esta vez por un camino algo mas señalizado pero no lo suficiente para no volver a equivocarme y subir a un pico diferente mientras los Keas planeaban a mi alrededor relamiéndose el pico pensando en la próxima comida. Finalmente conseguí conquistar el Avalanche peak desde el cual un suspiro reconfortante salió de mi boca para paralizar el tiempo y el paisaje lleno mis ojos con la importancia que merecía por primera vez en el día.

La bajada no fue menos dura, el cansancio y la fatiga se apoderaban de mi cuerpo y el tiempo me presionaba para intentar llegar a la carretera lo antes posible para poder conseguir un viaje hacia mi próximo destino.

Al llegar a la carretera y tras esperar sin éxito durante 3 horas decidí andar los 10 km que había hasta el lugar donde había dormido el día anterior ya que solo me quedaban 9$ y acampar cerca del pueblo estaba completamente prohibido. Al llegar a la zona de acampada con a noche en los talones de nuevo decidí dormir esta vez completamente a la intemperie, sin ningún refugio para poder contemplar la inmensa cantidad de estrellas que había en el cielo. Nunca antes había visto tantas estrellas ni la vía láctea con tanta nitidez. Dándomelas de perro viejo decidí dejar las cosas claras desde el primer momento con los Keas así que esta vez me llene los bolsillos de piedras y los mantuve a raya hasta que les quedo claro que esa noche no iban a poder conmigo y se fueron a buscar fortuna con otras personas que también acampaban ahí.


Día 4- Arthur’s Pass- Lake Pukaki

Como dice el refrán, “a quien madruga dios le ayuda” y esta vez el primer coche que paso paro, supongo que para mantener la estadística con el día anterior que no pude conseguir ningún viaje. Esta vez era un antiguo gánster motero, de los que van en Harley Davison, y me conto la suerte que tuvo de haber dejado la banda 20 años atrás y mudarse de isla ya que hoy en día lo habrían matado porque sabía demasiadas cosas ilegales. También me conto que había estado en la cárcel y que su hermano todavía seguía en la banda y que no podía dejarla. Un buen hombre que a pesar de su pasado turbio supo salir a tiempo. Después de que un estudiante de la universidad de Lincoln me dejara en el arcén de la intersección con una cerveza en la mano mientras él seguía su camino hacia Dunedin para asistir a una fiesta “épica” en la que las calles se llenan con hasta 10000 estudiantes (cifra impresionante para la población de Nueva Zelanda) me puse a caminar en la dirección que necesitaba tomar para llegar a Lake Pukaki, un enclave único que me había recomendado un alemán que me había encontrado en la cima del Avalanche Peak y gracias al cual cambie mis planes del Lake Tekapo al Lake Pukaki.

Tras un par de kilómetros caminados me recogió un señor también muy agradable y simpático que tenía una granja de lechera, sin embargo también resulto ser el Rector de la misma universidad que el chico que me había dejado poco tiempo atrás. Tras contarle lo corto de mi historia me ofreció dinero insistentemente, el cual rechace y le explique que solo aceptaba comida o bebida. Tras insistirme  varias veces considere que no debía de importarle tanto el dinero y acepte los 60$ que me ofreció (¡hay que ser honrado pero no tonto!) En previsión de que aun me quedarían mínimo 6 días en Auckland hasta volver a tener dinero y que aun tenía 10$ (me encontré un dólar en el arcén) los guarde en el bolsillo de no tocar y seguí mi camino como si nada, “solamente con 10$”. Tuve suerte y en un viaje conseguí llegar hasta Lake Tekapo donde pase unas horas e intente ir a pescar donde me habían dicho pero resulto no ser buena idea ya que no tenia cebo ni plomos y hacía falta una licencia, así que seguí mi camino hasta Lake Pukaki, esta vez con un señor mayor de 76 años que había sido guía de montaña y había estado en el polo sur, y me conto todas sus batallitas. Se ofreció a llevarme hasta mi próximo destino, Mt Cook, pero tenía demasiada curiosidad por ese paraíso del que me habían hablado y lo que había visto hasta entonces no tenia desperdicio. Así que me quede y aproveche para darme el primer baño del viaje en ese lago azulado por los sedimentos que acumula el glaciar que lo alimenta y disfrutar de una impresionante puesta de sol.

Día 5- Lake Pukaki-Mt.Cook(Mueller’s hut)-Queenstown

A la mañana siguiente, como siempre me desperté temprano y anduve 3 km hasta conseguir el primer viaje del día, un piloto de avionetas turísticas de los que aterrizan en los glaciares, que me conto algunas historias y me dio algunos consejos sobre la meteorología de la zona. Como era típico en las rutas que hacia siempre conseguía recortar los tiempos oficiales que anunciaban para la ruta, esta vez más de 1 hora en un recorrido de 3.5h de ida. Conseguí subir los más de 1800 escalones y más de 1000m de altitud que tenía el recorrido hasta llegar al Mueller’s Hut. La bajada al igual que en Avalanche Peak fue bastante dura, pero tuve la suerte de encontrarme de nuevo al señor de 76 años que me había llevado el día anterior hasta Lake Pukaki, con la suerte de que se volvió a ofrecer para llevarme hasta el pueblo más cercano fuera del parque nacional. Casualmente había ido a una fiesta el día anterior en la que habían sobrado muchas cosas y a él le habían tocado las bebidas, así que me volví a encontrar en el arcén con 2 latas de medio litro de cerveza y una botella de vino blanco. Volví a tener suerte en el siguiente viaje con el que conseguí hacer 200km y una cena gratis y un par de cervezas gratis, gracias a un americano que trabaja en Afganistán era el que conducía y otros dos autoestopistas que recogimos en el camino. Uno de los ingleses me invito a cenar y ya que no salían de fiesta (por que venían de la fiesta “épica” en Dunedin) quede con el americano que también me invito a dos trozos de pizza. Tuvimos una charla interesante mientras yo me bebía la cerveza y el vino que me había dado el hombre de 76 y el unas cervezas que se compro. Después de visitar un par de bares conseguimos encontrar uno medianamente bueno en el que me invito a una cerveza de un litro. Como no había ningún sitio donde acampar en la ciudad me cole en un aparcamiento de caravanas y dormí entre dos edificios y dos árboles cerca de donde había escondido la mochila anteriormente. Mire al cielo y viendo que estaba prácticamente resguardado no saque la funda vivac, aunque hubiera llovido esa tarde hacia una noche agradable.

Día 6- Queenstown-Routeburn track (día 1)

Esa mañana no necesite alarma, el frio y las gotas de lluvia que caían en mi cara hicieron el trabajo. Había llovido y todo estaba mojado, el saco y yo que estaba dentro. Ya había luz suficiente para que me vieran así que recogí todo lo más rápido que pude y me gaste 4$ en la secadora del camping para solo media hora de máquina que no consiguió secar todo el saco. Claramente un error que pague bastante caro. Saliendo del camping uno de los vigilantes me paro pero conseguí esquivarlo diciéndole que había venido simplemente a devolverle una cosa a un amigo. Así que me indico la salida y ahí estaba, de nuevo en la carretera tras un fatídico contacto con la ciudad.

Me costó bastante tiempo llegar al punto de partida de mi siguiente ruta ya que estaba bastante alejada de las poblaciones circundantes y era una carretera que acababa en la ruta. Ande unos 7km en total por la carretera y gracias a un par de viajes conseguí llegar al comienzo de la ruta. El único problema que ya eran las 12.00 de la mañana, pero no me quedaba otra opción si no andar. Como siempre mi paso juvenil y acelerado y a pesar de llevar una carga considerable en mi espalda, me permitió recortar el tiempo estimado en una hora aproximadamente. Al llegar a Falls Hut (refugio de montaña), decidí seguir y pasar la noche a mitad de camino ya que me había dicho una señora que me había recogido que había unas piedras buenas para vivaquear. Desgraciadamente poco después de salir del refugio uno de los guardabosques me paro preguntándome por los tickets (Si estás haciendo una ruta de más de un día te obligan a comprar los tickets para quedarte en los refugios o en los campings que tienen en la ruta) que evidentemente no tenia, e intente explicarle mi situación sin decirle donde iba a dormir. Probablemente intuyo mis planes al verme a semejante hora, casi las 15.00, y con todo el equipaje a cuestas, así que me advirtió de que llamaría a los guardias para que patrullaran el camino y revisaran uno de los refugios de emergencia que había a mitad de camino (que era mi segunda opción). No tenia elección debía intentar caminar en menos de 3 horas, ya que solo quedaba ese tiempo de luz,  un recorrido de 6 horas para no estar expuesto a la multa de 500$ que me podía caer por dormir en un sitio no permitido. Me puse en marcha y en poco más de tres horas, me encontraba a escasos metros del segundo refugio, Mackenzie Hut, Escondido tras unas voluminosas rocas que servían también para vivaquear. Sin encender la linterna para no llamar la atención y valiéndome únicamente de la luz ambiental me puse a preparar la cena y el lugar donde iba a dormir, con algo de miedo en el cuerpo por si aparecían los guardabosques.

Día 7- Routeburn track-Te Anau-Kepler Track (día1)

Como de costumbre levantándome antes que nuestro amigo Lorenzo, recogí todo rápido y aproveche la nocturnidad para pasar por delante del refugio y así evitar que me vieran los guardas. Esta vez camine más tranquilo y sin preocupaciones dado que aun era muy pronto para encontrarme a nadie en el camino y que no me quedaba mucho para acabar la ruta. Al llegar a Lake Howden Hut me tome la libertad de entrar y desayunar como uno más, sin el miedo a ser descubierto sin haber pagado (ya que los tickets los piden por la noche). Use el gas y el agua caliente para hacerme uno de mis asquerosos desayunos de avena molida, que viene a ser una pasta asquerosa con grumos y sin apenas un sabor especifico, y también un té. Me tome mi tiempo, y decidí tomar uno de los desvíos que había hasta la cumbre más próxima el “Key Summit”. A eso de las 13.30 me dejaba en Te Anau un señor muy amable que me había dado dos manzanas, me había dicho algunos consejos sobre donde dormir esa noche y me había contado unas cuantas historias interesantes sobre cómo había adiestrado su perro para ser un perro de rescate. Pese a la información que había recopilado indicándome que había un albergue gratuito cerca de la ciudad, al preguntar en información me confirmaron que debía de ser un error del ordenador y básicamente me volvía a quedar otra vez sin un sitio donde dormir, ya que Te Anau es una de las bases de los guardabosques y estaba prohibido acampar y bien patrullado todo el territorio alrededor de la ciudad. Tras meditar las posibilidades y habiéndome informado del único camping gratuito que había en la siguiente ruta, y para hacer un poco de tiempo decidí ir al supermercado a por algo de carne, ya que instintivamente notaba la falta de proteínas tras 6 días comiendo arroz. Me gaste los “últimos” 5$ en medio kilo de carne empaquetada (rollo mortadela) y un paquete de pan de molde, y no pude esperar a comérmelo así que me hice un par de emparedados en la misma puerta del supermercado. Volví a caminar hasta el principio de la siguiente ruta que se encontraba a 5km de la ciudad y otros 5km más hasta Brod Bay el lugar donde pasaría la noche. Este camping no era gratis así que para evitar a los guardabosques de nuevo me escondí en la costa entre matorrales de un metro y con vistas al lago. Era ya casi de noche y estaba a punto de empezar a montar mi campamento cuando me di cuenta de que había un barco de los guardabosques en la costa, así que rápidamente puse todas las cosas dentro de la maleta y aprovechándome del color oscuro de mi ropa y la poca visibilidad que había, me camufle pretendiendo ser una roca. Para mi desgracia el barco iba mucho más lento de lo que yo esperaba, estaban chequeando bastante bien, y la costa estaba llena de unos mosquitos llamados “sandflies” que me acosaban constantemente picándome en las únicas zonas que no tenia cubiertas, los tobillos, las manos y la cara, aprovechándose de mi incapacidad para moverme. Casi 15min duro el “checkeo” de los guardabosques y así mi pequeña tortura. Una vez paso lo único que deseaba era meterme en el saco y la funda vivac, cerrarla hasta arriba y despertar al siguiente día.

Día 8- Kepler Track (día 2)

¡El día más duro de mi viaje! Tras una semana de calentamiento en diferentes rutas de diferentes longitudes venia la prueba final. Tras haber calculado la hora perfecta para empezar a caminar, ya que no quería llegar demasiado pronto al primer refugio para no levantar sospechas, me pongo en marcha sobre las 6:30 de la mañana con un largo día por delante y con la intención de batir mis propios límites. Con la ventaja de que había caminado ya unos 5 km del camino, me puse en marcha y en 2 horas y poco había llegado desde Brod Bay hasta Luxmore Hut donde aproveche para hacer una parada, desayunar, y prepararme un café caliente con mucha, mucha azúcar que había cogido en una cafetería el día anterior, para tener energía para el resto del día, que iba a ser largo. Tras una media hora me puse de nuevo en marcha. Afortunadamente al pasar de los 1200m de altitud aproximadamente cruce las nubes que parecían no acabar y las deje tras de mi pudiendo sentirme como si estuviera en el monte Olimpo con los dioses, un lugar tranquilo, soleado apartado del mundo y por encima de todo. Un mar de nubes que solo se rompía por los grandes picos de los Alpes del sur que formaban las islas y archipiélagos que me rodeaban. Tras volver a bajar al mundo real, buceando en el mar de nubes, te introducías directamente en un clima totalmente selvático que de no haber sabido que estaba en Nueva Zelanda habría pensado que estoy en algún punto selvático cerca del ecuador como Colombia. Sobre las 14.00 de la tarde ya había alcanzado Iris Burn Hut donde prácticamente descanse un poco y aproveche para llenar un poco la botella de agua. El cansancio empezaba a apoderarse de mí, mi mente se mantenía fuerte y mis músculos aun podían tirar de mi cuerpo pero mis pies empezaban a sentir el exceso de peso y pasos. Me quedaban apenas 4 horas y media de luz y aun tenía que recorrer unos 19km. Sin pensarlo dos veces me puse de nuevo en marcha intentando ser constante y en las subidas apretar bien el paso para poder ganarle tiempo a las señales que me decían que aun quedaba 6 horas para llegar, tiempo que yo no tenía. De nuevo me encontré con una guardabosques, esta vez ya no pensaba parar y menos con el tiempo que me quedaba así que a pesar de que me hablo y le contesté, seguí andando en mi dirección (contraria a la que ella iba) y no le quedo otra alternativa que seguirme si quería intentar obtener información. Le explique mi situación y que estaba haciendo la ruta en un día, ya que le dije que había empezado en el aparcamiento, se asombro por que llevaba la mochila con todas las cosas y no termino de creerme así que empezó a hacerme un cuestionario sobre donde había dormido y donde pensaba dormir. Le dije que ya encontraría un sitio cuando llegara a Rainbow Reach y que no se lo diría para que no viniera a buscarme, y solté una carcajada irónica. Quizás por el ritmo que llevaba, por que iba en dirección opuesta a la suya o por que no le di la información que buscaba, finalmente se dio por vencida y siguió su camino. Me había librado de la guardabosques sin mucho problema, todo iba bien. Tras 2 horas sin haber llegado a Rocky point Shelter me entro el bajón y decidí hacer un descanso de 20 minutos para que mis pies descansaran y comer algo y tomar un poco de café, ya que solo había comido un par de emparedados hacia más de 4 horas. Tras recomponerme un poco, seguí caminando y para mi sorpresa había parado a escasos 500m de Rocky Point Shelter, el punto intermedio entre Iris Burn Hut y Moturau Hut. Eso significaba que estaba en buen camino, que podría llegar a mi destino antes de que anocheciera, y me dio fuerzas para continuar mi camino a un buen ritmo. La noche se me echaba encima, los pies me ardían y la fatiga se empezaba apoderar de mí, aunque aun podía controlarlos con mi mente, el gran poder de la mente, que lleva el cuerpo a límites insospechados. Todavía no había llegado a Moturau Hut y sabia que desde ahí todavía me quedarían unos 3 km hasta el camping donde quería llegar. Empecé a ojear el entorno por si podía quedarme a dormir en algún punto del camino, mi cuerpo quería parar pero mi mente no le dejaba, debíamos llegar hasta el final. Finalmente a eso de las 18.00  logre ver el refugio y la indicación que había en la entrada donde estaban escritos los tiempos a cada lugar, Shallow Bay 35min. Media hora más de camino que parecía una bendición después de todo el día caminando, la emoción por llegar me hacia andar rápido y a veces sentía casi ganas de correr solo por llegar y poder sentarme quitarme la mochila y suspirar profundamente en el final de la jornada. Después de 12 horas caminando rápido (contando las paradas; 1hora y media aproximadamente) había logrado el objetivo, había conseguido hacer los 42km que distaban entre Brod Bay y Shallow Bay, con unos 15kg a la espalda.

A parte de la zona de acampada había un refugio de lo que no tienen guardabosques dentro y en el que no había nadie esa noche, chequee el libro de visitas para saber con qué frecuencia pasaba el guardia y con qué frecuencia había gente allí. Había entradas de hacia 3 o 4 años así que no debía de ser un problema el pasar la noche allí sin pagar. Después de haber estado sentado durante media hora descansando y revisando el libro de visitas me dispuse a ir a por leña para encender un fuego en la maravillosa chimenea del refugio, sin embargo al ir a levantarme mis pies no tenían fuerzas para sustentar mi cuerpo, había sido una largo día para ellos, así que tuve que gatear y arrastrarme moverme dentro del refugio. Ese día tuve una cena especial, una combinación de todo lo que tenia: arroz, manzana, puré de patatas, y fideos chinos (noodles) que la verdad no sé si era por el hambre o mi habilidad mi tolerancia con la mayoría de los alimentos lo encontré exquisito, muy cerca de plato de restaurante.


Día 9- Kepler track-Invercargill-Fortrose

El día siguiente me lo tome con más tranquilidad ya que le había ganado un día a la planificación, así que me prepare el desayuno, encendí un fuego en la playa y me di un baño en el lago, el segundo. También había jabón en el refugio así que aproveche para usarlo y para limpiarme una rozadura del pie que se me había infectado un par de días atrás y que por desgracia no había podido limpiar más que con suero por que la crema antibiótica y el betadine que tenia habían caducado y los había tirado antes de empezar para no llevar más peso de la cuenta. En el camping había dos tiendas enormes como si fueran de circo que parecían abandonadas, ya las había visto la noche anterior pero estaba tan cansado que ni les había prestado atención. La curiosidad empezó a crecer y empecé a gritar preguntado si había alguien. Solo la brisa y algún pájaro exótico contesto, así que me dispuse a investigar. Al abrir la primera encontré que no había nada dentro, así que me dirigí a la segunda, en esta si había cosas, habían montado como una cocina dentro y parecía que no había habido gente en los últimos 2 días, eche un vistazo por encima y me tome la libertad de coger algunos suplementos para mi dieta, un poco de queso, un par de barritas de cereales, unas galletas y unas cuantas mandarinas, nada en abundancia. La suerte me acompañaba de nuevo y justo cuando salía de la bahía, una barca llegaba a la playa donde se encontraba el camping. Tras acabar la ruta en Rainbow Reach volví a la carretera para alejarme de los Alpes del Sur y dirigirme a la costa sudeste. Por suerte para mis pies, las grandes rutas se habían acabado y ahora solo me esperaban kilómetros de asfalto con el dedo gordo apuntando al cielo.

Un viaje hasta Te Anau y desde allí pude conseguir uno directo hasta Invercargill aunque con algunas paradas. Un cazador que volvía a casa y que tenía que hacer un par de trabajillos por el camino. Tras una hora de camino, paramos en una lechería para que tintara unos cristales que reflejaban luz en una cámara, mientras tanto yo me dedique a ver como 1000 vacas entraban en la central para ser ordeñadas y me pregunte cuantos litros de leche se sacarían a la semana ya que las ordeñan 2 veces al día durante todos los días del año. No llegue a ninguna conclusión pero me dedique a observarlas y a disfrutar del buen tiempo que me acompañaba. Al llegar a Invercargill había hecho una nueva adquisición, venado, carne de ciervo recién cazada que me había dado el cazador que me había recogido. Le di las gracias y continúe mi camino para alejarme de la “gran” ciudad, ya había comprobado que no es fácil sobrevivir en las ciudades sin dinero. Me dirigí a Fortrose, un pequeño pueblo en el comienzo de la costa sudeste denominada “The Catlins” donde me esperaban pingüinos, delfines, focas y leones marinos acompañanados de los impresionantes paisajes marinos de la zona. Y esa noche disfrute de una impresionante puesta de sol en la playa y un magnifico cielo estrellado.

Día 10- Fortrose-Nugget point

No necesite alarma esa mañana ya que me desperté con el “claqueteo” de la lluvia golpeando contra la funda vivac. Afortunadamente esta vez la tenía puesta. Me quede un rato ahí dentro esperando que la lluvia amainara un poco para mojarme lo menos posible. Afortunadamente, paro, y en menos de diez minutos ya había recogido todo el equipaje y estaba en la carretera. Tiempo justo para no mojarme ya que empezó a llover de nuevo. Fui a la única tienda del pueblo para que me rellenaran la botella de agua y me eche de nuevo a la carretera. Tras unos 5 km andados pude conseguir un viaje que me llevo hasta el siguiente pueblo donde resguardado en una parada de autobús aproveche para desayunar, hacerme un té y secarme un poco antes de volver bajo la lluvia a esperar fortuna. En menos de 2km había conseguido otro viaje que me llevo hasta Waikawa, a solo 6km de Curio Bay mi primer destino en Catlins donde podría ver delfines surfeando en las olas y pingüinos. Entre en el museo gratuito del pueblo para esperar que amainara un poco y para secarme y aproveche para ver la cantidad de artilugios de hace 2 o 3 siglos que tienen aquí de cuando colonizaron la isla. A mitad de camino de Curio Bay me encontré con una japonesa que iba en bicicleta y me dijo que no había ni delfines ni pingüinos, que era un mal día para ir. Charlamos un rato mientras volvíamos a Waikawa y me dio un par de riquísimas galletas. En tan solo dos viajes me había plantado en Nugget Point donde tenía planeado pasar la noche, el mal tiempo no acompañaba y no había muchos coches en la carretera así que iba a tener que andar mas a partir de ahora. Me acerqué al faro y la fuerza del viento golpeo mi cara al asomarme al mirador. Tenía que agarrarme a la barandilla para no perder el equilibrio. El buen tiempo que me había acompañado hasta ahora se había acabado y a pesar de que los días serian menos duros físicamente lo serian más moralmente. Volví a la bahía donde había un refugio que servía para observar los pingüinos. Eran las 16:00 de la tarde, así que decidí esperar por si venia gente y pasar la noche allí, así por lo menos estaría resguardado del viento y de la lluvia. Mientras tanto me dedique a mirar los pingüinos y su graciosa forma de andar. Empezó a llegar gente ya que era la hora en la que los pingüinos salen del agua después de haber estado pescando todo el día para volver a sus nidos. Apareció una pareja de Inglaterra que había estado viajando y estuvimos charlando mientras veíamos como los pingüinos saltaban de piedra en piedra con dificultades para llegar a sus nidos. Les conté mi historia y se ofrecieron a llevarme a un camping al que iban a ir y darme los 3$ que me faltaban y al día siguiente llevarme a Dunedin que era mi próximo objetivo. Tras un pequeño debate acepte su hospitalidad y fuimos al camping donde el dueño me dejo dormir en un cobertizo en obras para protegerme de la lluvia. Compartí mi carne de venado con ellos y tuvimos una deliciosa cena dentro de su furgoneta y después vimos una película, todo comodidades después de lo que me esperaba.


Día 11- Nugget point- Dunedin

Tengo que decir que se duerme muy bien cuando estas bajo techo, solo la sensación de no despertarte con el saco mojado por la humedad te da energías para empezar el día. Tras un desayuno ingles que me invitaron nos pusimos en marcha siguiendo los consejos del dueño del camping para ir a Cannibal Bay donde podríamos ver elefantes marinos, leones marinos y focas, finalmente solo conseguimos ver los dos últimos, y después nos pusimos en camino a Dunedin. Una vez en la ciudad nos dimos cuenta que no había mucho que ver o hacer allí, pero me ofrecieron quedarme con ellos y al día siguiente partir hacia Christchurch, mi destino final. A mí no me importo ya que tenía el viaje asegurado y había visto todo lo que tenía que ver. Les explique que no quería ser una molestia pero de nuevo insistieron en que me quedara con ellos así que no tuve más remedio que aceptar. Fueron de compras y yo me dedique a ser su perrito faldero pero era cómodo, no tenía que llevar mi mochila a cuestas ni preocuparme por conseguir un viaje. En cuanto terminaron las compras salimos de la ciudad y nos dirigimos a un camping que estaba en las afueras de camino a Christchurch. De nuevo vimos una película y esta vez como estaba lloviendo me ofrecieron quedarme en la parte de delante de la furgoneta. Tras rechazar la invitación numerosas veces y que me lo pidieran incansablemente acepte, total era un sitio seco, lo único que no quería es molestar. Así que vimos otra película y me dieron chocolate, un producto que no había probado desde España.

Día 12- Dunedin- Winchester

Después de esos dos días nos habíamos tomado cariño mutuamente así que ya me incluían en sus planes con toda normalidad e incluso me preguntaban si yo quería hacer esto o lo otro. Yo siempre me abstenía y ellos siempre estaban de acuerdo así que era una perfecta simbiosis. Paramos en Timaru, una ciudad a mitad de camino entre Dunedin y Christchurch. Fuimos al museo al supermercado y en la oficina de información nos dijeron un sitio donde podíamos acampar gratis que estaba a una hora y media de Christchurch. Yo no tenía prisa por llegar y ellos tampoco así que volví a pasar otra noche con ellos, de todas formas no tenia sitio donde dormir en Christchurch y ya sabéis que las ciudades no es un buen sitio para estar sin dinero. Esta vez pese a que estaba lloviendo intentamos hacer un fuego para calentarnos así que comenzamos a cortar leña, menos mal que siempre llevo el cuchillo de supervivencia para estos casos. Tuvimos suerte y un hombre que estaba paseando a su perro nos vio y nos trajo leña seca por lo que se hizo más fácil empezar el fuego, y así tuvimos un maravilloso fuego donde sentarnos a contar historias como si de una acampada de colegio se tratara. Esta vez no hubo película pero volví a dormir en la furgoneta seco que siempre es agradable además ya había cogido la postura y dormía del tirón, con una pierna entre el volante y rodeando la palanca de cambios con la rodilla.

Día 13- Winchester-Lake Pukaki

Al parecer no tenían tanta prisa en llegar a Christchurch y como les había hablado maravillas de Lake Pukaki, decidieron ir allí antes de ir a Christchurch para no tener que volver, ya que ellos se quedaban allí trabajando antes de irse a Australia a hacer la temporada de invierno en una estación de esquí. De nuevo no me importo compartir trayecto con ellos pese a haber estado ya en el lugar, pero de nuevo no tenia sitio donde quedarme y me habían dicho que Christchurch se podía ver en unas cuantas horas. El día no acompañaba para disfrutar de las vistas como se merecía pero habían mirado el tiempo y a la mañana siguiente estaría despejado. El día transcurrió prácticamente alrededor de un fuego que empezamos y que duro casi 12 horas hasta que nos acostamos.

Día 14- Lake Pukaki- Christchurch

La mañana se despertó despejada y aunque fue un poco tímido el Mt Cook asomo su impresionante cima y el cuento se hizo realidad. Nos pusimos en marcha bastante rápido ya que había que llegar a Christchurch que aun estaba a unas 4 horas de camino. Al llegar allí pudimos ver la dura mano de la naturaleza, como el simple movimiento de la tierra generado por un terremoto puede acabar con una ciudad. La mayoría de las calles estaban en obras, cerradas, grúas por todas partes y montañas de escombros. Las calles mostraban grietas por todas partes, las aceras eran irregulares cuando había y un ambiente de decadencia rodeaba la ciudad. Llego el momento de la despedida. Les agradecí una y mil veces todo lo que habían hecho por mí, les di mi dirección de correo y mi teléfono por si venían a Auckland, y nos deseamos suerte mutuamente. Volvía a estar solo tras unos excitantes días en compañía, pero en cierto modo anhelaba esa soledad, esa libertad de poder dirigirte a cualquier sitio sin tener que dar explicaciones o simplemente quedarte callado para escuchar el mundo moviéndose a tu alrededor. Tenía ganas de explorar por mi cuenta así que pedí un mapa en la oficina de turismo y pregunte por todas las actividades gratuitas que había en la ciudad. Fui al museo que sorprendentemente y pese al aspecto antiguo que tenía, no había sido dañado y estaba abierto al público. La exposición que más me impacto fue la de los viajes a la Antártida y al polo sur y toda la historia que hay sobre ello. Después me dirigí a la principal atracción de la ciudad, el centro comercial que han construido en el centro con contenedores de los barcos, y es realmente impresionante lo bien  que lo han hecho y lo conseguido que esta. Aquí la mujer de un español con el que había estado hablando en la puerta de la oficina de información, vino por qué me estaba buscando para darme dinero. De nuevo lo rechace pero insistió en que aceptara al menos el dinero del autobús al aeropuerto. Estuvimos charlando un rato y me conto como les había ido su luna de miel, y yo le conté como había ido mi viaje, un rápido intercambio de historias y claramente dos puntos de vista diferentes. Ellos estaban “cansados de tanta naturaleza” y yo estaba “cansado de tanta ciudad”

La siguiente atracción y la última que había en el centro era un bar, sala de exposiciones y de conciertos que habían construido con pales de madera apilados. Estaba bastante conseguido. Y pensé “Es impresionante la capacidad creativa humana como crece cuando menos recursos hay”. Luego volví al centro comercial de contenedores y me hice, la ultima cena, un revuelto de todo lo que me quedaba que de nuevo me pareció una especialidad gourmet. Poche las manzanas con los polvos de los fideos, freí las zanahorias y lo poco que quedaba de la mortadela. Coci el arroz con piri-piri y la salsa que se había creado y con el caldo sobrante hice el puré y los fideos, todo en la misma olla. ¡Vaya cena propia de un final feliz!

De camino al aeropuerto pare en el McDonald para gastarme los pocos céntimos que me habían sobrado del dinero que me había dado la española en un par de helados de 60centimos. Y de nuevo tuve suerte al encontrar mantequilla y mermelada para mis dos últimas rebanadas de pan que tenia guardadas para antes de montarme en el avión. Después tranquilamente camine hasta el aeropuerto y volví a montar mi campamento una vez más.


Día 15- Christchurch- Auckland

Me desperté a las 5 ya que el avión salía a las 6.30 de la mañana y me desperté rebelde. Ya que no me habían pedido el pasaporte, DNI o carnet de conducir en el vuelo de ida, decidí examinar la seguridad de los aeropuertos en Nueva Zelanda. Lo primero que hice fue prepararme el desayuno, un par de tostadas y té, para lo que necesite encender el infernillo en medio de la terminal para mis tostadas. No recibí ninguna amonestación y a nadie pareció importarle el olor a quemado característico de unas tostadas cuando se hacen en una olla. Estaban deliciosas por cierto. Decidí arriesgarme un poco más y deje la bombona de gas dentro del equipaje facturado, cosa que está totalmente prohibida. Fui un poco precavido y la deje a mano por si me registraban la mochila que no tardara mucho en salir. La segunda vez no me sorprendió pero no me pidieron ningún tipo de identificación ni en el check-in ni en el control de seguridad y el billete solo me lo pidieron en el avión para sentarme. Lo que si me esperaba es que me registraran la mochila pero de nuevo sorpresa, la mochila estaba intacta y con la botella de gas dentro. Una sonrisa se dibujo en mi cara, había llegado a casa podría dormir en una cama después de 14 días y comer carne y verduras que las echaba de menos y lo mejor de todo que aun tenía el dinero que me habían dado para sobrevivir hasta mayo. El viaje había sido todo un éxito.

Quiero agradecer a todas las personas que me han ayudado en este viaje por haberlo hecho de esa forma tan cariñosa y desinteresada, y por compartir sus historias y su tiempo conmigo. A todos ellos, ¡Mil Gracias!

Caminate, son tus huellas
el camino y nada más;
Caminante, no hay camino,
se hace camino al andar.
Al andar se hace el camino,
y al volver la vista atrás
se ve la senda que nunca
se ha de volver a pisar.
Caminante no hay camino
sino estelas en la mar.
(Antonio Machado)



  
Datos del Viaje (Aproximados):
Distancia total recorrida
2170km
Distancia total andada
170km
Distancia andada en carretera
43km
Distancia en rutas y senderos
127km
Tiempo invertido
15 días (328h)
Dinero invertido
45$


“I tramp a perpetual journey” (Walt Whitman, song of…

As I told you I will not be regular in the language of my postings so will probably depend in my mood, and apparently I fell English today!
First of all I have to apologize in case I have any mistake in my grammar or spelling. As you will probably know English is not my native language.
I am using the blog somehow in a way to experiment not only with my feelings, to improve my narrative or my English but also to interact and experiment with the readers. Maybe this post should be written in the future in order to have more people reading my histories but the idea just came into my mind and I want to express it.
Today I am experimenting with non native English speakers, specifically from Spain, that is where I am from. I want to see if they would do the effort to read in English and try to understand what here it is said. I think the title of the blog is challenging but hopefully everyone get to understand the meaning of it.
As I was telling you yesterday, one year ago life was easy living in a living room, no privacy but lot of fun with good friends. It seams that I am getting use to live in weird places with no privacy as I was doing at the beginning of 2012 when I was living in a friend’s garage in exchange of housekeeping their house, ahh… “good times”. A good cleaning, an extra bed from the dorms of the university and some restrictions in the schedule due to an ultra heavy metal band practice some days of the week. (the worst was the toilet issue) But it is true not always have the necessary resources to live comfortably or in a “regular” way, specially economic resources which are the most likely to miss while living in a city. So there I a was, little money, but still living with my friends a wonderful time, just to prove the world that it is possible to survive without the main source in a hostile environment, the cities. Now a day they are sometimes asking me to move for a while to their garage so I guess it was a good symbiosis.
And to end I wish to thank all that persons who in some point of their lives put up with  me either in their houses, living rooms, garages, vans or any other form. Thank you very much!

“I tramp a perpetual journey” (Walt Whitman, song of…

As I told you I will not be regular in the language of my postings so will probably depend in my mood, and apparently I fell English today!
First of all I have to apologize in case I have any mistake in my grammar or spelling. As you will probably know English is not my native language.
I am using the blog somehow in a way to experiment not only with my feelings, to improve my narrative or my English but also to interact and experiment with the readers. Maybe this post should be written in the future in order to have more people reading my histories but the idea just came into my mind and I want to express it.
Today I am experimenting with non native English speakers, specifically from Spain, that is where I am from. I want to see if they would do the effort to read in English and try to understand what here it is said. I think the title of the blog is challenging but hopefully everyone get to understand the meaning of it.
As I was telling you yesterday, one year ago life was easy living in a living room, no privacy but lot of fun with good friends. It seams that I am getting use to live in weird places with no privacy as I was doing at the beginning of 2012 when I was living in a friend’s garage in exchange of housekeeping their house, ahh… “good times”. A good cleaning, an extra bed from the dorms of the university and some restrictions in the schedule due to an ultra heavy metal band practice some days of the week. (the worst was the toilet issue) But it is true not always have the necessary resources to live comfortably or in a “regular” way, specially economic resources which are the most likely to miss while living in a city. So there I a was, little money, but still living with my friends a wonderful time, just to prove the world that it is possible to survive without the main source in a hostile environment, the cities. Now a day they are sometimes asking me to move for a while to their garage so I guess it was a good symbiosis.
And to end I wish to thank all that persons who in some point of their lives put up with  me either in their houses, living rooms, garages, vans or any other form. Thank you very much!

“Todo comienzo tiene su encanto” (Johann Wolfgang Goethe)

Pues lo dicho el comienzo tiene su encanto. 
Tras varios meses pensando en que debería escribir un blog y bajo presión de algunos amigos por saber de mis experiencias, o por tener historias que contar a sus amigos como me han dicho algunos, comienzo este blog para vuestro deleite. No prometo nada, ni ser regular en las publicaciones, ni en el idioma, ni siquiera en el contenido así que a caballo regalado no se le mira el diente. Eso no significa que no acepte críticas, sugerencias o comentarios.
Para comenzar haré como en algunas películas el denominado efecto “flash-back” así que voy a intentar remontarme un año atrás para saber que estaba haciendo.
Después de haber mirado el calendario de hace un año creo que el 29 de abril de 2012 me encontraba seguramente viviendo en un salón, con el pelo largo y viviendo en Granada. Si tal y como suena, no había habitación, ni paredes ni mesilla de noche. Una cama en una esquina del salón cubierta por una sabana negra y una alfombra de cáñamo que colgaban entre la pared y una estantería que hacía de columna delimitaba “mi propiedad” de poco más de 4m2. Como mesita de noche una silla y como libro de cabecera el manual de supervivencia del curso que realice poco antes. Mis amigos me habían dejado habitar el salón a cambio de una cantidad simbólica que iba a comida u otros placeres banales como cerveza o whisky. Desde mi cama y entre los estantes de la “columna” se veía la tele del salón, aunque la mayoría del tiempo no la veía desde ahí si no que me unía a mis amigos para ver algún documental, un partido, un programa basura o jugar al mítico “pro evolution soccer” con unos mandos que a duras penas funcionaban. En total 6 personas habitábamos la casa, en la que se alternaba entre el estudio, el ocio y la fiesta, aunque por esa época predominaban las dos últimas.
Una vida fácil, sin problemas, aunque la vida es como el póquer, unas veces estas arriba y otras abajo. Por aquel entonces me encontraba arriba…

“Todo comienzo tiene su encanto” (Johann Wolfgang Goethe)

Pues lo dicho el comienzo tiene su encanto. 
Tras varios meses pensando en que debería escribir un blog y bajo presión de algunos amigos por saber de mis experiencias, o por tener historias que contar a sus amigos como me han dicho algunos, comienzo este blog para vuestro deleite. No prometo nada, ni ser regular en las publicaciones, ni en el idioma, ni siquiera en el contenido así que a caballo regalado no se le mira el diente. Eso no significa que no acepte críticas, sugerencias o comentarios.
Para comenzar haré como en algunas películas el denominado efecto “flash-back” así que voy a intentar remontarme un año atrás para saber que estaba haciendo.
Después de haber mirado el calendario de hace un año creo que el 29 de abril de 2012 me encontraba seguramente viviendo en un salón, con el pelo largo y viviendo en Granada. Si tal y como suena, no había habitación, ni paredes ni mesilla de noche. Una cama en una esquina del salón cubierta por una sabana negra y una alfombra de cáñamo que colgaban entre la pared y una estantería que hacía de columna delimitaba “mi propiedad” de poco más de 4m2. Como mesita de noche una silla y como libro de cabecera el manual de supervivencia del curso que realice poco antes. Mis amigos me habían dejado habitar el salón a cambio de una cantidad simbólica que iba a comida u otros placeres banales como cerveza o whisky. Desde mi cama y entre los estantes de la “columna” se veía la tele del salón, aunque la mayoría del tiempo no la veía desde ahí si no que me unía a mis amigos para ver algún documental, un partido, un programa basura o jugar al mítico “pro evolution soccer” con unos mandos que a duras penas funcionaban. En total 6 personas habitábamos la casa, en la que se alternaba entre el estudio, el ocio y la fiesta, aunque por esa época predominaban las dos últimas.
Una vida fácil, sin problemas, aunque la vida es como el póquer, unas veces estas arriba y otras abajo. Por aquel entonces me encontraba arriba…